SLUG Localized featuring: DJ SkratchMo, Show Me Island, and Rhyme Time

High energy, colorful decorations, and humor follow Rhyme Time wherever he goes. After knowing Rhyme Time personally, and witnessing performances dating back to 2013, I truly see him as a Salt Lake City hip-hop OG. With that said, he is also a very unusual rapper. He’s a middle-aged man with a large afro, extra pounds around the waist, and a most notable appreciation of the unorthodox. This is evident from his 80’s jumpsuit that he wears from time to time, his songs dedicated to a space penguin, and his everlasting love for the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles.

If you aren’t familiar with Rhyme Time, you may remember him from his previous moniker, “Atheist.” Which, if you know anything about Utah, is clearly a bold move. Before you judge his views on religion, I want it known that he has collaborated with fellow rapper, JamesTheMormon, so there is proof that he’s not exclusionary in his music, regardless of his difference in religious opinion. I attended this show to witness Rhyme Time’s latest music, but I enjoyed the two other acts, DJ SkratchMo and Show Me Island, as complementary acts.

Show Me Island is a groovy reggae/ska band with trumpets, drums, guitars, and a powerful female vocalist. I was pleasantly surprised by the funkiness of their sound, as I went into this show with no prior knowledge of their music. Watching them perform alongside Rhyme Time and his House of Lewis crew was a much appreciated 180 from the predictable and expected boombap beats and electronic synthesizers that dominate hip hop. They were an enjoyable band that I would listen to again, but my music tastes don’t align with adding them to my playlists. However, if you are really into ska, I would highly suggest checking them out!

DJ SkratchMo started the show with cutting and spinning records of various genres. In hindsight, I don’t remember any noteworthy jams making me excited for him to be on the decks, but he didn’t make me want to leave, so there’s that. Unfortunately, I didn’t pay as much attention to his time on stage, but I have seen him multiple times and his broad taste in music is extremely valuable for a DJ.

Overall, these SLUG Localized shows are excellent events for music discovery and provide a great way to network within the Salt Lake City music scene. I came for Rhyme Time, and was very happy with the additional performances, even if I wasn’t able to pay the most attention to them. I would highly recommend anyone over 21 to check these shows out for a good time, while still supporting your local music scene!

 

If you’d like to check out Show Me Island you can find them at: showmeisland.com
Both DJ SkratchMo & Rhyme TIme can be found at their collective’s website: http://www.thehouseoflewis.com/the-music/

G-Eazy in SLC!

The man known as G-Eazy is currently moving up in the rap game in leaps and bounds. Almost as quick as his home basketball team the Golden State Warriors took over the NBA. Gerald Earl Gillum is a 26 year old rap artist coming out of Oakland, California. His first album had tremendous success peaking at number 3 on the US Billboard 200, and his latest album, When It’s Dark Out, has already hit number 5 on the same chart since it’s release date December 4th 2015.  To support his album’s release G-Eazy is hitting the road, and much to our delight he will be making a stop in Salt Lake City on January 9th at The Saltair.

Gerald is the Steph Curry of the hip hop world right now. He’s on fire. So much so that the show is entirely sold out already. Admittedly, the tickets have been on sale for a few weeks now, but nonetheless selling out The Saltair is not a small feat. Luckily for all the G-Eazy fans who procrastinated buying their tickets I have good news. There will be an after party at The Hotel Elevate, which is a 21+ club located in central Salt Lake City. G-Eazy himself will be hosting this party, so for those of you who are of age and either missed buying a ticket to the show, or just want some more Gerald for your night check the following link.

https://www.saltlakecityconcerts.net/eventx/g-eazy-official-afterparty/

G-Eazy has several songs on youtube in the million view range already, and countless in the hundred thousands. I’ve included a few songs for those of you who have not heard his music yet, and also anybody who just wants to hear some hot tunes.

 

 

 

D.GLOVE: MY GLASS CEILING

My first run through of D.Glove’s album, My Glass Ceiling definitely captured my attention. But not for the right reasons. This album has a lot of moments that seem like generic reiterations of popular music themes. The issue was lack of lyrical creativity.

In my least favorite chorus, D.Glove repeatedly says, “I just want to go down in history.” Not a bad thing as far as historical impact goes. Even though it is a positive desire his word choice loses creativity points.  Other notables include:

“I’m taking life day-by-day”
“Baby I would never ever go nowhere without you,
“When you’re not around me I always talk about you”
“My sunrise, My sunset, It’s one touch”
“It’s one breath, It’s our life, lets live it together”

This chorus feels slightly more thought out, and I have to give it praise. I would say D.Glove can improve his word choice.

The other major aspect of Hip-hop music, and music in general is the beats/production quality. Overall, D.Glove’s production quality was solidly satisfying. On-track, was number three titled, “Together.” The beat resembles an EDM song you’d hear at a rave. D.Glove combines Hip-hop and EDM by trying rap over the beat. For me, it missed the mark.

I noticed songs 4 and 5 have almost the exact same beat. Once again, I have to dock D.Glove for absence of ingenuity. His beats were all quality, but at times they didn’t mesh with the Rap.  These details didn’t jump out until the third playback, at which point I was hitting skip on almost every track.

D.Glove released his album My Glass Ceiling with the best intentions.  His themes and song concepts are all very positive, but something  miss-fired in the delivery.

It frustrated me to hear D.Glove’s basic and repetitive choruses, knowing he’s better. He gets props for crisp and clean production, but Beat flow and rapping didn’t work. I hear D.Glove’s potential, which is why I look forward to improvement.

Overall I’d give My Glass Ceiling by D.Glove, a stout 4/10