Hidden Gems of SLC: Catès Café

Looking for a new place to relax and study? Wishing you didn’t have to pay for coffee? The answer to both questions is closer to campus than you may think.

Enter Catès Café

Located on the corner of 200 South and University Street, the coffee shop is just across the street from President’s Circle. It can be easy to miss at first as it is part of a Catholic Center, but if you approach the building from the east side and follow the rampway to the left you’ll find yourself right at its entrance.

Inside is a homely venue. The scent of coffee hangs in the air and an assortment of furniture beckons you to unwind and relax. Of course, if you’re a student and coffee is on your mind you’re probably looking to study instead of relax, and Catès Café has you covered. There are plenty of tables with convenient charging stations for you to situate yourself in, as well as a room off to the east side of the cafe intended for those looking for a quieter space to study.

The Coffee

Anything that is labeled “free” is as likely to be celebrated on a college campus as it is to be warranted with suspicion, but I can personally say the price is right. For free coffee, it even tastes better than what some dedicated coffee shops offer. The trade-off is that you’re making the coffee yourself. But it’s a fairly quick and straightforward process to make pour-over coffee and there is almost always someone at the cafe who is willing to help.

Such hospitality risks feeling insincere at a church, offered only in tandem with pressure to join or donate, but I’ve never experienced that at Catès Café. In the wake of more sexual abuse cases coming to light within the Catholic church, the cafe, in comparison, feels like a reminder of the values a church should strive for. Hospitality is offered for hospitality’s sake, and I’d like to see other churches make similar efforts.

With the relaxed atmosphere, the sense of accommodation at Catès Café reminds me of the ambient music of Brian Eno’s Music for Airports. The music is styled to work perfectly as background music. While it is rendered beautifully through Eno’s meticulous method of composition, it never demands your whole attention. Like the cafe, you are free to visit and leave, soaking in as much or as little as you want.

 

 

Slim Shady’s Comeback: Kamikaze

Will the real Slim Shady please stand up?

Back in the late 90’s Eminem (Slim Shady/Marshall Mathers) made his debut. Eminem began working with Dr. Dre, which he clearly states in his song “Mockingbird,” about his daughter Hailie. “And that’s when Daddy went to California with his CD And met Dr. Dre and flew you and Momma out to see me But Daddy had to work, you and Momma had to leave me”

www.vsbattles.wikia.com

Eminem always wrote music about his life. Back in the 90’s he mainly wrote about his daughter and his past. Hitting the 2000’s he released the Marshall Mathers LP which was the fastest selling album in rap history. The following year he released Devils Night which featured the songs “Mockingbird” and “Toy Soldiers.”

Downslope In Career

Over the next few years, he slowed down making music due to his toxic relationship with Kim Mathers. After a long going custody fight over their daughter, Mathers got into drugs and nearly died of an overdose. In 2010, he began his comeback and started to make music again with the likes of Rihanna, Drake and others.

In 2018 Slim Shady stood up once again

Without any notice, Mathers released the album Kamikaze which shocked everyone. He dissed on several rappers and even the President. On the album, he disses Lil Pump, Lil Yachty, Joe Budden, Ja Rule, and most prominently Machine Gun Kelly.

Kamikaze

Kamikaze really gets Em’s message across which is “f*ck you new rappers, I am the OG.” The album kicks off with “The Ringer” which sounds distinctly new, yet still the classic Eminem we all know. His flow throughout the album was insane, and I personally am liking it.

My second favorite song in the album had to be “Lucky You” ft Joyner Lucas. This song really spoke out to me especially the lines where Joyner & Eminem say, “Back on my hood shit, it’s back to the pushin’ These packs and I’m actually pumpin’ Can’t f*ck with you rappers, you practically suckin’ You mighta went platinum, but that don’t mean nothin’ I’m actually buzzin’ this time.” Shady is saying who cares if you’ve won something? I am the old rap, the good rap.

Multiple rappers responded to Eminem’s disses and some even took jabs at his daughter. Ja Rule spoke out stating, “Guess that Hailie line must be starting to hit home.”

www.hippopandmore.com

Following Ja Rule the most controversial diss was directed at MGK, who released a diss track in responseEminem’s main call out was this: “Now you wanna come and f*ck with me, huh?/This little cock-sucker, he must be feeling himself/He wants to keep up His tough demeanor, so he does a feature/Decides to team up with Nina/But next time you don’t gotta use Tech N9ne if you wanna come at me with a sub-machine gun/And I’m talking to you but you already know who the f*ck you are, Kelly/I don’t use sublims and sure as f*ck don’t sneak-diss/But keep commenting on my daughter Hailie.” MGK responded calling Eminem “sober and bored”

Shady definitely made a comeback and who knows what he will do next. Kamikaze called people out and shocked the world a little bit in classic Eminem style. His candor “f*ck you” attitude really conveys his message, but hey Slim Shady has never been one to mince words. Overall this album was a good mix of his old stuff and his newer albums like Revival. I enjoyed the straight fire roast to all these new millennial rappers.  Very good job indeed Slim Shady.

https://genius.com/discussions/34082-Slim-shady-vs-eminem-you-decide

Cranberry Juice: The Only Line of Attack Against Infection

When I interviewed U of U Junior, Kaitelynne, and her roommates, Ladonne and Kielie, they lounged around their downtown apartment. Several advanced chemical engineering textbooks rested on their coffee table.

When I asked about her grades, Kaitelynne shrugged modestly. “A’s, mostly. Those don’t help with basic wellbeing, though.”

Questionable Education Rendering Women Ill (Seriously)

Like most women who were both adolescents in Utah and sexually active later in life, Kaitelynne has a common malady. “Every woman I know–every one–has had a urinary tract infection at some point,” she says. Ladonne and Kielie nodded, and your journalist is not an exception, unfortunately.

“No one told me I should pee after sex,” she told me. “We spent three weeks on sex ed when I was 15 years old. They didn’t tell the gals that one extremely helpful tip.”

Utah’s sex ed is certainly not winning gold stars. This is, after all, the state in which senator John Valentine made the slightly queasy claim that “[sex education] should not be taught in our schools! Those things should be taught in the home.”*

(Picture of John Valentine by Scott G. Winterton, Deseret News)

“It’s funny, because it could literally kill me. And other women,” Kaitelynne said. “I can make a car engine. Literally. I could take a bucket of pipecleaners and some gasoline and make a combustion engine. But I didn’t know that women should have a post-coitus wee.”

What To Do Next

Kaitelynne confessed that she can’t stop rushing to the bathroom, and it constantly feels as though her kidneys are on fire. “I have no health care, I can’t afford a doctor visit or medication, and I’m constantly in pain,” she admitted. “But I can afford cranberry juice. I have six dollars.”

The beverage, costing roughly three dollars for half a gallon (a bargain!), can supposedly lessen UTI symptoms. Rather than sweet, sweet antibiotics, Kaitelynne takes only juice and optimism, the great American cure-all.

Recognizing the importance of solidarity, Ladonne and Kielie set up a gofundme for Kaitelynne. It has currently raised four dollars, enough for only more cranberry juice.

Image result for cranberry juice

(Picture of “medicine” by Organicfacts.net)

“Hey, there’s nothing else we can do,” Kaitelynne says, before excusing herself to use the restroom yet again.

–Sarah

*John Oliver. “Sex Education”, Last Week Tonight. Timestamp 6:27. Watch Here.

The Hip Hop Drip remembers Mac Miller

The Hip Hop Drip is K-UTE Radio’s show for hip hop lovers, and as huge fans of Mac Miller, we were shocked and saddened to hear about his recent passing. The hip hop community lost yet another young legend, as the 26 year old Pittsburgh-native rapper/producer lost his battle with substance abuse and addiction.

This loss of life is yet another blow to the hip hop landscape after losing Lil Peep, Fredo Santana, XXXTENTACION, Jimmy Wopo, and countless others in the span of a year.  

In the days after, it’s only right for us to celebrate Mac’s accomplishments and thank him for the impact that he had in each of our lives.

A true artist

Mac Miller’s artistic abilities were noticed at an early age. Described as a “self-taught musician”, he was able to play the drums, guitar, bass, and piano. Playing these instruments started him down the road of making music and dropping mixtapes in high school. At fourteen years old, Mac released his first mixtape entitled But My Mackin’ Ain’t Easy under the name EZ Mac. After releasing numerous well-received projects, Mac signed with the independent Pittsburgh-based record label Rostrum Records.

His clout skyrocketed from there as he often collaborated with other artists signed to Rostrum Records including fellow Pittsburg natives Wiz Khalifa and ID Labs. It wasn’t long after that he announced his first studio album Blue Slide Park, which debuted at number 1 on the Billboard 200 and was the first independently distributed album to take a number one spot on the Billboard albums chart since 1995.

Fans watched Mac’s art evolve and grow, as he began producing beats under the name Larry Fisherman and going on to release numerous critically-acclaimed projects including Macadelic, Faces, and GO:OD AM. Mac released his last album Swimming on August 3rd, 2018, one month before he would be found unresponsive in his Studio City flat in Los Angeles, California.

Tyki’s take on Mac Miller

I was relaxing with my girlfriend on a Friday afternoon when the news about Mac Miller broke out. This one hit hard because he’s one of the few artists that we generally agree about, so we loved playing his music together. For me, Mac has always had a genuine likability about him. He is among the few artists that can hit almost any vibe with his music, while still standing out as one of the prominent backpack artists of my generation.

In addition, I know many of us felt as if we grew up with Mac Miller. I look back on lighthearted memories of being in my best friend’s backyard throwing down back flips on a trampoline while blasting “The Spins”. Mac took us along a journey throughout his career. As we watched him from his earliest days as the corny kid on the lacrosse team who would say anything for the rhyme, to being the multi-talented and deep artist we knew him as today. Mac was loved for his juxtapositions of wildly differing themes like motivation and depression. It was no surprise that he stood out as an inspiring voice in a generation full of lost kids.

As of now any possible motives or theories pertaining to his death are purely speculation, and in my opinion, of no real value in Mac’s case anyways. However, it was abundantly evident in the events leading up to his death that his mental health was not a high enough priority. I loved Mac, and I think I speak for all of us when I say that I was really rooting for him. As his life appeared to crumble in a matter of months, he hit us with some of his most inspiring work, which is why I think his death came as such a shock to many fans.

While his fans and family were hopeful for Mac, it’s clear that nobody knew the whole story. Sadly, history’s most talented and moving artists often turn out to be very self-destructive. Unlike other young artists to pass before their time, Mac left us with a prolific body of work that his admirers will be able to cherish forever.

Kyle’s take on Mac Miller

When I heard about Mac’s passing, I was at work just scrolling through /r/hiphopheads on Reddit during some downtime. I refreshed the page and at the top was a TMZ article saying that he was dead at age 26. Immediately after googling it, I found many more articles saying the same thing. It felt like someone kicked me right in the gut. I couldn’t believe this had actually happened.

Something about Mac’s passing feels different to me. The first song I ever heard from him was  “Nikes On My Feet” from his mixtape KIDS. I heard this song back in 2011 during my freshman year of high school. The song was dope and I proceeded to check out more of his music. I enjoyed the fresh sound that he brought to hip hop. It was so fun and playful and it kept me listening for a while.

I eventually drifted away from his music later on in high school because I thought his music was for kids. Later on I realized that this was a stupid reason to not listen to someone’s music.

When I picked his music back up again, it was right around the time that he released his sophomore album Watching Movies with the Sound Off. This album has a lot of sentimental value to me because I listened to it during a tough time. The song “REMember” has a very special place in my heart and I’ll always love it. It isn’t easy to cope with traumatic things in life, but this song helped me and I’ll always be grateful.

Mac was a very versatile artist and had something for every type of hip hop fan. He had bangers, heartfelt love songs, emotional songs, and drugged-out anthems. This is why Mac was such a unique artist; everything he did stood out in its own way compared to the rest of his discography.  He showed so much artistic growth and it was a pleasure to witness.

It still doesn’t feel real that Mac Miller is actually gone. It feels like I lost a big brother, and I’ll always miss him. He will be sorely missed in the hip hop community and in the lives of his many dedicated fans.

Thank you for everything you did for us and hip hop as a whole, Mac. You will never be forgotten and your legacy will live on in the hearts of all who loved you.

  

Highlighted tracks

“2009”

“Buttons”

“Fight the Feeling”

“The Best Day Ever”

“Birthday” (as Larry Fisherman)

J. Cole – Concert Review

On September 8th, Salt Lake City was blessed by the presence of one of the biggest hip hop artists out right now. Yes, the great J. Cole performed here for the first time in three years on his KOD Tour, and it was quite the show to behold.

Opening acts

The show started at about 8pm, with EarthGang coming out to perform first. They kicked the show off with a mix of  popular songs including “Missed Calls” and “Can’t Call It”. They brought good vibes to the crowd and it’s safe to say that they’ve earned some new fans.

After EarthGang finished up their set, it was Jaden Smith’s time to shine. Smith’s set was when the crowd really started to get into the concert mood and turn up. He performed songs such as “Batman”, “Icon”, and “George Jeff”, to the delight of many of those in attendance. To finish off his set, Smith performed “Icon” once again as he raced through the entire lower bowl. The crowd loved this and it got them into the performance even more. Jaden Smith put on a great show and he was a quality opener, as evident by the amount of hype he generated for the main act.

Young Thug was supposed to perform after Jaden Smith, but he didn’t show up for an unknown reason. With no third opening act, the crowd was left with a DJ playing music from J. Cole’s Dreamville label while they waited for Cole to come out. The anticipation was at an all-time high and the crowd could hardly contain it. More and more people started filing in from the concourse. And as the clock struck 9:15pm, the show kicked off.

Cole World

This is the moment that everyone had been waiting the whole night for. The openers were cool, but it was finally time for J. Cole to come out.

Suddenly the whole arena went black. The huge video monitor on the stage lit up and showed images of an infant right after it was born, with “KOD Intro” playing in the background. Once the intro ended, J. Cole appeared and we faintly heard the beginning of “Window Pain (Outro)”. Cole perfectly captured the emotions in this song with his performance, and it was a very harrowing moment. The crowd was in awe seeing one of the greatest artists of their generation performing it.

Next, Cole threw it back to 2014 Forest Hills Drive and played crowd favorites “A Tale of 2 Citiez” and “Fire Squad”. After these tracks, he brought it back to KOD and played the majority of the album.   

Cole didn’t just stick to these two albums however. To the delight of many fans, he played a few tracks from his debut album Cole World: The Sideline Story, as well as a couple from 2016’s 4 Your Eyez Only.

After throwing it back a bit to his previous work, Cole took a moment to address the crowd about very serious issues that are currently facing our society. With emotion in his voice, he talked about the mental health crisis that he addresses quite frequently on KOD. This was the most emotional and heartfelt that I’ve ever heard J. Cole, and it was my personal favorite moment of the entire show. He urged the crowd to love their life and seek help when they need it, and then he played two of his more personal tracks, “Love Yourz” and “Apparently”.

Following the sentimental moment, Cole played more tracks from 2014 Forest Hills Drive and then finished the show with the last two tracks from KOD. The album’s title track, “KOD”, was another highlight of the show, purely because you could tell that the entire crowd was waiting for it the whole night.

Cole then thanked the crowd for showing up to the show and then walked off the stage. They chanted “one more song” until he finally came back out and performed perhaps his most recognizable track, “No Role Modelz”. He definitely closed out the show with a bang.

Final Thoughts

This was absolutely a night to remember. J. Cole put on an amazing show that was well worth the money that those in attendance spent. He performed songs from every era of his music and truly encompassed his entire artistic direction. It was especially cool hearing him perform his older tracks and being able to compare them to his latest. It really shows the growth that he has had and makes me  appreciate him that much more.

If you missed this show, I urge you to go see J. Cole when he comes to Salt Lake City again. Even if you aren’t his biggest fan, you will get your money’s worth.

Truly an Endless Summer

Summer is all about letting loose and having fun. This year G-EazyLil Uzi Vert, Ty Dolla $ign, Murda Beatz, YBN Nahmir, and P-Lo joined up for the Endless Summer Tour. Named after G-Eazy’s mixtape Endless Summer (2011), the concert took place at USANA Amphitheatre on July 26th, 2018. Having this many performers created the perfect summer concert. Each performer had their part in making the endless summer tour come to life. 

A Dance To Start The Show

http://www.audibletreats.com/gallery/p-lo/

http://www.audibletreats.com/gallery/p-lo/

The Endless Summer Tour kicked off with P-Lo. I hadn’t really heard of him, until that day. I only knew a few of his songs like “Feel Good” ft. G-Eazy, so I wasn’t too hyped on his performance. Still, he did a good job of getting people ready for the show. He had some pretty sick dance moves and everyone kept yelling “Go P-Lo Go Go P-Lo Go…” as he danced.

Shaggy-Haired Skater Turned Big-Time Producer 

Following P-Lo was Murda Beatz. Mostly famous for producing songs by Drake, Migos, Travis Scott, and many other, his part of the concert was showing off the hits. Everyone turned up for “Nice For What” which was produced chilling in Drake’s apartment one night.

The one thing that shocked me about Murda was how he looked. He didn’t look like a big-time music producer. His shaggy hair and normal appearance didn’t flaunt his fame. He kinda just blended in. Little did we know he has been behind the scenes for many songs. 

YBN Nahmir

YBN Nahmir definitely got my interest. I hardly knew about him prior to the show, but he really knew how to get the crowd going. He is a younger artist but showed off his true summer vibe. A few popular songs are “Rubbin Off The Paint” and “Bounce Out With That”. He is also featured on G-Eazy’s “1942”.

https://www.livenation.co.uk/artist/ty-dolla-ign-tickets

Ty Dolla $ign

Ty Dolla $ign drew in the ladies of the crowd. He knew how to sing and rap and boy did that get the ladies in their summer vibe. The crowd loosened up, getting a little wild and free in prep for the rest of the concert.

He played a lot of music but the ones that stuck out to me were “Or Nah”, “Sucker for Pain”, and “Love U Better”.

Lil Uzi Vert

The hype god, Lil Uzi Vert, was up next. There were skulls, upside-down crosses, and coffins on top of all the speakers. This goes along with his whole lucifer persona. Lil Uzi started the show with a bang and got the crowd on their feet.

Lil Uzi crowd surfed which got everyone to turn up even more. During “XO TOUR Llif3”, the audience started going crazy. Lil Uzi Vert had the place hyped up, as everyone was dancing and singing.  He looked insane, but in a fitting manner that worked for this .

Endless Eazy

Saving the best for last: G-Eazy. He has had my heart for a long time with his classy vibe that you will never miss. G-Eazy is known for taking samples from old 50’s songs as you can hear in his mixtape Endless Summer.

Eazy performed a ton of songs my favorites being “Say Less” and “1942” ft. YBN Nahmir. He had a nice flow of songs during his performance and brought a Mustang up on stage which added to the classy feel.

G-Eazy gave me a concert of a lifetime that I will never forget it. I believe that’s the impact he wanted his tour to have. To create an endless summer. At least the memory of one.

Morahnic Satire: Local Professor Sponsored by Mountain Dew

Image result for mountain dewMany students are familiar with the “fuck it all” taste of Mountain Dew. It’s a staple of final’s week! But now, at many universities, professors are turning to the drink too. As part of their revolutionary marketing strategy, the soda company now caters to the overworked people on both sides of the classroom.

“We’re really looking forward to breaking this new market,” a Mountain-Dew representative told me, in his cedar-lined office at Pepsico. After offering me a bag of cool ranch Doritos, he continued: “Mountain Dew has always been counter-culture, but we had to get out of our parents’ basements somehow.”

Related image

I Just Can’t Pay My Bills, Local Professor Says

“I worked for twelve years to earn a doctorate, another five years as a post-doc, and finally secured a tenure-track position. But it turns out my stable, prestigious job just can’t quite cut it anymore,” claims Chemistry professor, Dr. Jordan. She continued: “The sponsor is really just to take the edge off.”

Dr. Jordan spends roughly forty hours of her week researching, and another forty teaching. Yet, when pouring over the bank statement with her spouse a few months ago, they found they couldn’t make ends meet.

“At first, it did feel a bit like I was selling my soul to the fresh, lemon-lime beverage,” she admitted. I expected her to perhaps say that her mind had subsequently changed, but she didn’t.

Bizarre Classroom Experience

On Monday morning, Dr. Jordan’s Chem 2010 students neatly filed into their lecture hall. Bottle-shaped cardboard cutouts surrounded them. The Mountain Dew logo had replaced Mendelevium (Md) on the Periodic Table Decals. When I glanced a student’s copy of her syllabus, I noticed it was printed in neon-green ink. Unreadable.

The lecture proceeded restlessly. Dr. Jordan would occasionally pause to take a long, refreshing swig of Diet Dew. Her team of three or four grad students would mimic her.

Image result for woman at a vending machine

When the lecture ended, I caught a shifty-looking student at the door, and asked her what she thought. She stammered something about “late-stage capitalism.” Later, I spotted her at a vending machine, purchasing a Code Red Mountain Dew.

–Sarah

Smashing Pumpkins; A Smashing Success!

Super Smashing Bros.

Smashing Pumpkins made their return to Salt Lake Tuesday night in all their glory. Its almost Halloween, so who wouldn’t want more pumpkins in their life right now? With electrifying sounds that stunned the crowd, this concert was nothing short of phenomenal. It isn’t a surprise that when the Smashing Pumpkins announced an original line up tour, tickets would sell out and, sell fast. It’s been almost 20 years since the Pumpkins reunited with a tour. Through break ups and rough patches, dedicated fans lined the arena with a sense of excitement like children on Christmas morning.

Crowd in an Uproar

As I watched the people take their seats, I noticed an enormous age range, from teens to long-time parents. The large scope of devotees created a rare occurrence that not many bands are able to achieve. Different decades of people filled the arena from die hard fans donning original black “ZERO” tee shirts to today’s rock and roll youth. Either way the audience thrived at the spectacle.

The concert opened with a short video promoting important icons throughout the bands career, album art from Siamese Dream and Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness plastered the screen. 

When a bright light peered through a curtain of smoke to reveal one bald head and a shiny guitar, screams erupted that shattered the calm and destroyed the silence. This was it! Beginning the show was Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness  (the song). Behind lead singer Billy Corgan, was a film reel of photos that defined his past and illuminated his childhood.

 Dances of the Audience

Older fans waved drinks of beer and cocktails as their hips swayed to the sounds of mellow beats. It was songs like “1979” and Landslide that inspired people to wave phone lights like lighters- reliving the good old days in 21st century fashion. While songs like Cherub Rock and Mayonnaise  thrilled the audience. In addition, the stage provided energetic strobe lights of red and green with immaculate guitar solos that lasted for days! The stage choreography was like something out of a dream, wrapped up succinctly in the overall performance. This was a band at the top of their game. 

All the songs were praised by the audience in a storm of hand claps and foot stomps. Echos of lyrics paraded through the arena. Concert goers filled open spaces with dancing of 90’s angst and countless head bangs while rock horns saturated the crowd. The concert adrenaline voiced a roaring cacophony that transcended the stadium walls.

Return of the Pumpkins

The three hour concert consisted of twenty eight original songs with classic Pumpkin covers in between. With the founding members Billy Corgan, James Iha, and Jimmy Chamberlin united once again, the Smashing Pumpkin’s sound was on par with the original recordings. The band’s return to Salt Lake City gave a concert that united generations of grunge and a true alternative rock vibe to modern day fanatics. Indulging in a 90’s daydream, this performance will give Pumpkin lovers a night to remember.