A TWILIGHT ZONE: Antibalas / Kamasi Washington

A Twilight Zone, the chronicling of Salt Lake City denizens looking for music, adventure, & life at the Twilight Concert Series

Sarah

One of my favorite things about the Twilight Concert Series is their ability to showcase so many different styles of music. While last week’s performance of Kurt Vile could be best described as more country-rock style music, Kamasi and Antibalas put on a show strongly rooted in jazz and afrobeat, but both very different in tone and feel.

Before them, however, was a local DJ named DJ Ebenflow who got the crowd bustling with an interesting mix of DJ beats and 20’s style music. Even though it wasn’t my favorite, I thought his unorthodox mixture of old and new music was very different and interesting to hear. Plus, his man-bun was quite beautiful.

After DJ Ebenflow, Antibalas came on. One of the first things I noticed was the sheer size of the band. There were sax players, guitarists, trumpet players, drummers, the list goes on… Then, the band’s lead vocalist Amayo entered the stage in an elaborate white outfit and a personality that immediately captivated the audience. He sang about themes like peace, love, and mother earth. Each song almost felt spiritual in a way, and you could tell that the band members and audience were both feeding off the crowd’s energy.

Sadly, I had to leave before Kamasi came on, but I had a chance to research his music when I got home. The first video that came up on Youtube was a song called “Truth.” Even though the song is 14 minutes long, I got chills within the first 3 seconds. Beautiful visuals, melodic jazz, and political undertones immediately elicits emotion from the listener, which is exactly what good music should do.

Jacob

It’s Twilight season! A busy and important man like myself unfortunately cannot make each show, so last week’s Kamasi Washington show was my first of the summer. 

Getting there as late as I did, the first opener, local cat DJ Ebenflow, was already mid-set. I had never heard of him, but he has a pretty strong following in Salt Lake City and after hearing him live I can see why. His electronic music pulls classic jazz and swing samples and meshes them with his own beats. The result is a unique sound that could belong in a carnival or an old silent movie. Introduce your ears to him with his ‘I love the swing!’ set. 

Next up was New York based Afrobeat band Antibalas. Man, these guys are funky. Even at the K-UTE tent I couldn’t stop dancing. These guys bring strong brass instruments and a great stage presence and make a genre that’s generally unpopular a fun, uplifting experience. At this point, the crowd is starting to build. I was pleasantly surprised by the amount of people that came out to a jazz show, and especially surprised by how the young the crowd was. Maybe millennials will do something cool with our time, and keep jazz from going extinct, eh?

When Kamasi and his band finally came out the crowd went wild. With two drummers, a stand up bassist, pianist, vocals, an eclectic group of brass with a trombone, flute, and soprano saxophone, Kamasi led the gang on his sax and they were loud. They really got the place rocking with some of their classics. Easily my favorite part of the show is when everyone went through their solos. Every musician rocked the stage for five minutes or so, and then left the stage to the two drummers. Their back and forth battle was insane. Both taking completely different beats and twisting them over each other in a frenzied harmony sent the crowd over the edge. No one could stop dancing, everyone was moving around and having a good time. One thing I love about Kamasi Washington and his band us that they can push a political stance with the peacefulness that jazz requires. This was definitely one of the best shows I’ve seen all year.

Martyn

Then it was Thursday again, already, and I made my way down to Pioneer Park for the first Twilight of August so underneath the sun (again, it’s clichéd already) I walked forward to the beginning of the show. Comparatively, and perhaps because of no local band to open, there were few people surrounding the outskirts of the wearisome stage. I moved on into some shade.

A DJ by the moniker of Ebenflow came on and gave the audience something to dance to. They did. It lacked a certain personal touch of a local band, but hey, the sunburns were worth it for those dancers. After a quick break, I found myself in the VIP section, sitting on a white chair instead of my usual pose of ‘my feet hurt’. Antibalas came out and absolutely had me throwing that chair out of my place so I could dance. The wonderful jazz/funk group came alive with so much energy, the music twisting with heat to create a lively, energetic performance. Soon enough though, Antibalas ended their set and the crowd was growing.

Calm again, I went back for more tacos (mostly no one was eating the delicious zucchini filling). Kamasi Washington quietly made his way to the stage to engage in one of the most full-sounding

Twilight shows yet. With his band and singer Patrice Quinn by his side, Kamasi had the crowd grooving and moving to jazz in huge numbers. For this, I went directly into the middle of the crowd towards the front because you can’t not be taken in by someone performing with this much personality and this much vitality. The music itself was not out of place at a show like Twilight. Nothing was out of place, really.

Photos by Trevor Von Hake @trevorvonhake

 

A TWILIGHT ZONE: 90’s Television/Whitney/Kurt Vile & the Violators

A Twilight Zone, the chronicling of Salt Lake City denizens looking for music, adventure, & life at the Twilight Concert Series

Josh

A local happening, a local enigma, a local band is taking the opening slot for this concert. That band you ask? 90’s Television. An enduring sun hits the stage as the group grabs their instruments. A crowd of early arrivers crawls from the shadows towards the front of the stage. It’s a diverse group of slimy monstrosities: cyborgs, mutants, weirdos, voidoids. It’s an amalgamation of sunglasses, tank tops, and scaly skin recently burned by the salty city sun.

A groovy wave hits the crowd as the group opens a cold one with their classic tune “Radio 90s”. Oooweewoowee, now that’s what I call a hair splitting specter. The group appears to be locking the crowd into an unknown form of hypnosis using their powers combined. Drummer Jeremy Devine (known robot) mines unseen rhythmic crystals that are channeled by the guitars of both Greydon Benzmiller (resident wizard) and lead singer Dravland Brown (vampire spirit, incarnate). Dravland and Greydon send the harvested power into the hands of their trusted bassist, Craig (a friendly martian). Meanwhile, Craig’s head starts to become swollen with the kinetic energy of the group’s power pop inventions.

No momentum is lost as they power through classics like “Bug Girl” and new innovations like “Karmakazi”. As Craig’s head grows, the crowd becomes weary of what might become of the situation. The band closes with an expertly triangulated transmission of their hit “Channel Surfing”. The head is so far bloated at this point and explodes buckets of green foam onto the crowd. The radiation from the foam puts the crowd into a state of panic. Craig quickly regrows a fresh head, and the band exits the stage. Spectacular as this is, you must continue your journey, as the groups of Whitney and Kurt Vile are soon to enter frame…

Sarah

Considering last year’s Twilight Concert Series was how I originally became involved with K-UTE Radio, it was needless to say that I was extremely excited for this year’s lineup. My friend and I arrived at the concert just in time to see the local band, 90’s Television. They opened the show with surf/rock rhythms and a relaxed audience repertoire.

After their set, I headed towards the food trucks to scope out the dining options. I walked around for a while until I saw a lady carrying a small cup of light-purple liquid. Intrigued, I headed in her direction and found a Poutine truck selling drinks called “Hummingbirds” made of lavender soda and a lemon wedge. After being in the summer heat, I made the best decision of the day and ordered one. If you get a chance to go to the next Twilight Concert, so should you.

Soon enough, I heard the rumble of the next band coming on and headed back to the crowd. The first thing I noticed was the sheer size of the band. SIx people including a trumpet player and a lead singer playing drums took up the stage. They announced their name, Whitney, and played a set of seemingly upbeat songs with underlying darker themes like depression and break ups.

Even though I had never heard of Kurt Vile & The Violators before the concert, I took a listen to the song “Pretty Pimpin'” before the show and immediately fell in love. While I wasn’t a huge fan of his other music, my friend has a video of me going ham to that song which might double as blackmail later on. His quirky, introspective lyrics and country-style guitar riffs make him a perfect artist to sit down and listen to on vinyl.

Martyn

I re-awoke after a weirdly long week of not going to Twilight Concerts in time for this week’s Twilight Concert. After walking through the city of Salt Lake under a ceaselessly unwavering sun, I arrived (again, shivering with anticipation for lanyard glory) through the gates into the park which has now become a real haven of sorts on Thursday nights. You could say music was in the air or something like that.

The first band, 90’s Television opened up against the final afternoon blaze with pure rock ‘n roll. More local heroes adorning themselves in deserved spotlight had the crowd shimmying. I saw two patrons holding up larger-than-accustomed-to print outs of the bassist’s head. The bassist laughed, we laughed, the sun went down a little further. Wearing only sunglasses sans prescription, I bumbled my way through people on blankets and unsteadily placed-on-the-grass drinks.

After sneaking behind the K-UTE table to rest on a weirdly comfy bucket, I went back into the crowd for openers Whitney. The experience of seeing a lead vocalist/drummer live is something of note, even if the songs (albeit a cover of the “Golden Girls” theme) had a steady and unwavering rhythm. The songs weren’t exactly catchy but the sounds still fulfilled expectations. Concurrently, I was awestruck by the power one band member had using and instrument called a trumpet. Each time this trumpet would blow, the crowd would immediately begin woo-ing and clapping in awestruck mob fascination at the certain long note emanating from the small brass.

Finally, as the night began to wrap around the stage in an awesome shroud, Kurt Vile & the Violators came on the massive applause. Week Two was slowly ending in between the songs which already had a melancholic air and I felt a pang of sadness. Kurt Vile had that certain rock-star swagger and great jeans you’d come to expect from someone out of Philadelphia. When with his band, the songs flourished; when solo, Kurt Vile still held people in attention. After his set, the crowd dispersed into the night amongst talk of past and future and I headed to the train which was way out.

 

 

Photos by Trevor Von Hake & Sarah Nelson

 

 

A TWILIGHT ZONE: Angel Magic / Xenia Rubinos / Little Dragon

A Twilight Zone, the chronicling of Salt Lake City denizens looking for music, adventure, & life at the Twilight Concert Series

Martyn

And so we’ve finally come to the beginning, ending a drought of park concerts since around this time last year. The Twilight 2017 Concert Series has commenced and the musical acts ushering in these ultimate days of summer played one exemplary opening concert. To my and other’s disbelief (or relatively minimal confusion as to ‘why?’), this was my first Salt Lake Twilight concert as I only started listening to music in the most recent past. 

Having satiated my hunger and finding a water bottle for the evening from a friend, I received my lanyarded pass and walked towards the entrance with strides on lanyarded confidence. Inside, the sun cast an oppressive glow on the field as the opening band Angel Magic began to set up.  A local dream/synth/pop band given this Twilight spotlight is a quantifiably gargantuan opportunity and their sound carried wonderfully through the park. This was obvious because several fans were encouragingly shouting ‘your sound carries wonderfully through this park!’. Technical errors aside (a keyboard ran out of D batteries (PSA please carry D batteries)),  Angel Magic’s dreamy vocals and musical arrangements were able to make the crowd dance and behold! the keyboard still worked on the batteries running dry.

Around the time the next artist,  Xenia Rubinos, took the stage, there was the aforementioned and highly looked forward to twilight setting in and around Pioneer Park casting a steady glow amongst vendors and patrons. I hadn’t listened to her music so my expectations were set in absentia, and although the music lacked a certain solidarity of form, Xenia and her band put on an impressive set. Her movements were, as a friend put it, ‘a whole body doing a jazz hand’. I then tried my own turn at this dancing and fell over. Xenia’s lyrics repeated strong themes of identity and her powerful clear voice made the music second to what she was saying. It worked in synchrony.

Headliners Little Dragon were finally taking the stage in a grand entrance of ethereal proportions. With her large headdress (matching her fingernail color mind you), lead singer Yukimi Nagano looked majestic and overwhelming. Ushering in their set with a newer song, “Celebrate”, the rest of Little Dragon was pure dance magic. Lights, motion, and song blended into pure ecstasy emotion. The band played wonderfully from start to finish with a neon glow of orange surrounding Yukimi’s headdress. I wandered ethereally between the crowd and food trucks on the fringes of the crowd and felt at peace.

Little Dragon finished their set with much longer remixes of their music which ignited the atmosphere around the stage. Once it was over, I walked out in the Salt Lake City night, wondering if anyone still had water. Settling for an answer of no, I descended into the city, awaiting the next show.

Nick

The stage is set, I can tell the crowd is charged up and the show hasn’t even started yet. Twilight is really incredible to have local artists at the top of their shows, it gives us something to connect with as a community. Tonight’s local spot light was Angel Magic. Their music has gumption, very fun synths, reverberating vocals, and emotionally charged expression. The duo are solid performers, focused on their craft. Angel Magic could be music for ethereal exposes. It was a very beautiful day, a nice billowing sky provided ample shade on a hot afternoon.

Then Xenia Rubinos came on. What a nasty groove that lady has got in her. Everyone in the front row lost their entire heads of hair. I don’t know if it was radiation from the UFO or excessive head banging. It may have very well been the way Michael Bouchelli kept on slapping the bass like he was mad at it. Xenia gave us a rap in Spanish. The drummer rewired his drums and changed up his sound. I’m not sure what this technique is called. It sounds cool though. Xenia is very multi talented. Playing the keyboard and singing. So much soul in this band. She was unstoppable sporting an all purple jumpsuit cinched at the waist with a fabulous belt. Xenia Rubinos finished off with vibing and some funky rapping.

After a minute the clouds got thick and a warm mist filled the crowd, It was time for the Swedish-based band Little Dragon, adorned in a thin red silk sheet Yukimi Nagano entered, with cool drummer Erick Bodin, slick bass player Källgren Wallin and Håkan Wirenstrand killing it on the keyboards. Excellent progression, incredible drops, and beautiful distortion of lovely bells. It makes one feel like they are at home and comfortable. The ground opened up beneath us and swallowed the whole concert. As we fell into the eternal abyss of night Little Dragon did not skip a beat. They proceeded to play their whole set as we fell together. Twas’ very good! Folks dancing, falling. We landed in a different location than when we started and we all had to go with it.

What a fantastic evening of fun and music. We’re all looking forward to what the next concert of Kurt Vile & the Violaters will bring, and what chaotic beauty Twilight has in store.

Twilight In Ogden: Miike Snow & Klangstof

Ogden Twilight has not disappointed me yet. If you’ve ever driven to Ogden from Salt Lake City, you may know how bad traffic can get between Farmington and Ogden. On the way to the Miike Snow concert, the traffic doubled due to an automobile accident. That did not stop me from seeing Swedish band Miike Snow and Dutch/Norwegian band Klangstof with a spotlight on local heroes New Shack.

Driving an hour north is usually worth it when going to the Ogden Amphitheater. It’s a very nice, friendly, and welcoming venue. When I arrived, I bought myself a frozen pink lemonade, and smoked while I waited for Klangstof. A very clear day, only a few small cirrus clouds in the sky. The place was getting packed. Due to the traffic, I only caught the last few moments of New Shack’s set. I listened to their music on SoundCloud when I got home. New Shack is from Provo, UT and they have a very new age indie pop sound.

Klangstof is a progressive/indie/alternative-rock band. The drummer would go back and forth from drum pad to traditional drums. Sometimes, you can tell when a band stumbled into the music industry; Klangstof is not one of those bands. These guys look like they have been on the grind for a while, and they are now on tour with Miike Snow. I fell in love with Klangstof‘s singer Koen Van De Wardt. He said the band, Miike Snow, had an incredible Swedish tobacco, but it stops working. The joke fell flat but I laughed.

From what I can tell, it can’t be easy to keep a band together. The way Koen kept all of his band mates engaged and relaxed showed me how real this band is. Very dual-sided, beautiful, light at times, with droning tones and complex shredding. This band was perfect for helping me release the built up tension from the awfulness of the world. After Klangstof‘s set, I felt like maybe things aren’t that bad.

After playing with the Pepsi Patrol, there was a brief introduction to the indie/pop/electronic band, Miike Snow, from the same host who introduces every Ogden Twilight I’ve been to. She introduced the band and then about ten minutes later Miike Snow came on.

This band had been apart for a little while working on solo projects. At first, they seemed to be very okay with me taking photos. It seemed Andrew Wyatt was even giving me some poses. I got carried away and kept taking photos. I’m very enthralled with this band in general. Towards the end, he seemed to break the pose he was making as soon as I lifted my camera (I don’t think bands like it when you watch their sets through your phone screen).

He kept a great and electrical energy the whole time; this band is so cool, Pontus Winnberg is my favorite.  The drummer, whose name I can’t find, had the key to my heart. the other band member, I can’t find his name either, absolutely stole the show with his sick licks. He was not regular bandmate Christian Carlson, he was not there on this particular night, however, he is a very important part of Miike Snow.

These guys are some real and professional musicians, which don’t always go hand in hand. I caught a glimpse of the setlist taped to the stage after the show and they had the encore they did on the set list. The encore song was “Animal”, a very popular song of theirs and I’m glad I got to see them play it.

This music definitely does not look easy to make happen every night sofor that, I thank you, Miike Snow. I can tell this band has made a real difference in people lives for the better. I’ve been a Miike Snow-Flake for a while now, it’s absolutely great music for dancing out the feels. Overall, a stellar end to the Ogden Twilight concerts.

 

New Shack- Soundcloud

Klangstof- Spotify

Miike Snow- Spotify

 

 

 

Rare by Hundredth: Shoegaze meets Hardcore

The album, Rare, by Hundredth is a unique concept. A melodic-hardcore band realizes that their sound doesn’t reflect their musical tastes, and make an effort to shift their focus from hardcore to shoegaze. This change brings them an intensity that the dream-pop genre tends to shy away from. Tracks like “Vertigo”, “White Squall”, and “Youth” are all very much post-punk, dream-pop ditties that are solid shoegaze with some edge. But ultimately, Hundredth seems to lack the nuances that drive shoegaze, and the sound suffers because of it.

While most dream-pop might bring to mind positive imagery such as rainbows and beaches, Rare shoots for more of a nightmare-ish feel, with lyrics such as “False hope/Spreads like a disease/The curtain is drawn/ And there’s no shepherd for the sheep” from the song “Disarray,” played over a soundscape featuring heavily distorted guitars, blaring power chords, and aggressive drum beats.

It is surprising just how well the band’s darker tone fits with the shoegaze sound. Hardcore and shoegaze seem like opposite ends of the musical spectrum, but Hundredth has really found a sweet spot where shoegaze reverb and hardcore’s intensity can meld together and create something uniquely enjoyable. Tracks like “Suffer” and “Hole” really showcase this hybrid sound.

Rare is a solid album, but it is impossible to shake the feeling that this is not the band’s full potential. Shoegaze, as a genre, has surprising depth with the diversity of emotions and sounds it can encompass and Hundredth just hasn’t quite mastered it. At a certain point, the songs all meld together in the worst way possible; there is little variation and that’s what really limits Rare. Somewhere in the album’s forty-five-minute run-time, the album loses its nuance. “Down” and “Chandelier” might start differently, but ultimately, they all become variations of the same song, just with different lyrics and slightly different chord progressions.

With Rare, Hundredth shows a lot of promise for the road ahead, and if you’re already a fan of the band, this album, while a massive departure from the rest of their discography, isn’t going to disappoint you. However, for everyone else, it’s a mixed bag. Tracks like “Vertigo”, “ Disarray ”, and “ Suffer ” are inventive and strong, but as a whole, the album just leaves a lot to be desired. My recommendation: go check it out because there is a lot to love, just don’t expect to fall in love with Rare as an album because the “pieces” aren’t all there yet.

Album Review – “Revenge” by XXXtentacion

Travis Scott, Lil Pump, Smokepurrp, Robb Banks, Ugly God. Among others, they are driving a new wave of hip-hop which is characterized by lo-fi bass with aggressive lyrics and vocals. One of the leading names in this sub-genre of lo-fi is rapper XXXTENTACION.

Hailing from Broward County, Florida, he shook the game with his hit single “Look at Me.” For that song, many tried to pigeonhole XXX into being nothing but a lo-fi bass artist. His new release, Revenge, demonstrates otherwise. Revenge features many tracks that were previously released through his SoundCloud, but are now compiled into a commercial release. Songs such as “King” and “Looking for a Star” show quite a contrast to the style we’ve come to expect. Yet, “YuNg BrAtZ” and “RIP Roach” still show that xxx isn’t afraid to go hard.

XXXTENTACION opens Revenge with “Look at Me”, which, to fans, is to be expected. It’s his leading single and works well as an attention-grabber, but also serves as a way to show contrast to the following tracks. The first of which, entitled “I Don’t Wanna Do This Anymore,” immediately shows this opposing sound. It’s still lo-fi, but the autotune shows XXX’s softer side presented in the form of a hybrid garage-style produced 808’s & Heartbreak and cloud rap.

Continuing to throw the listener through hoops, “Looking for a Star” features a distinctly dark yet tropical back beat produced by none other than EDM megastar, Diplo. Auto-tuned as well, but not over the top and cheesy, his vocals fit well with the song and its Jamaican-ish vibes. 

Moving on, we continue with this leaned out, almost lethargic feeling with “Valentine.” XXX almost seems to be taking notes from early Travis Scott or Yung Lean as he channels his inner sadboy and questions whether or not to continue down his current path, or stop everything and become a better person. The answer presents itself quite clearly on “King,” which starts out very similar to the previous track, dark and airy. This, however, does not last. In almost a hat tip towards his punk rock and heavy metal roots, distorted guitars and thundering drums accompany his screams of “HEY! YOU!” coming seemingly out of nowhere and marks a change in tone for the rest of the album.

However, the next track “Slipknot” continues the running theme of XXX wanting to show his audience that he isn’t a one-trick pony when it comes to rapping. Undoubtedly the most lyrical track on the album, it’s definitely his best attempt towards creating an old school hip-hop sound with piano runs and hooks similar to that of UGK and Outkast. XXX is out to prove that he can not only sing and scream, but also spit bars. It’s also the first track on the album to feature other artists, Kin$oul (who’s featured on the track) and Killstation (who sings the end hook).

Revenge returns to the sound of “Look at Me” with “YuNg BrAtZ,” and marks the return of the XXX we’ve come to know and love; Loud, aggressive, and ignorant toward the feelings of others to ultimately bring the album full circle. Not much can be said other than it’s definitely a crowd pleaser meant to whip the audience into a blood-thirsty frenzy.

The last track, “R.I.P Roach,” features fellow Members Only founder $ki Mask, The Slump God who more or less raps over the beat, as opposed to XXXTENTACION‘s hype shouts. Like “Look at Me” and the previous track, it carries XXX’s signature sound of distorted bass and screamed vocals. It also holds our objectively favorite line on the album with XXX essentially calling his haters “rice krispies.”

From top to bottom, Revenge proves that XXXTENTACION is not a one trick pony. As his first major commercial project, the album sets out to demonstrate his versatility and diversity. Only time will tell which direction he will continue, but as far as our opinion goes, we see X continuing his reign of bending genres, generating insane amounts of hype, and blowing out subwoofers worldwide.

“Baywatch” washes up like so much beach trash

Blame it on 21 Jump Street (the movie)’s success. After the failed revivals of ‘classic’ television shows like Ben Stiller’s Starsky & Hutch and Nicole Kidman’s Bewitched, these commercial and critical failures seemed to ruin the niche of popular television comedy to movie formula. But 21 Jump Street (and it’s subsequent sequel) proved to be cheeky and self-referential enough to garner the success the other adaptations couldn’t find. So now Baywatch has washed up on the cinematic beach starring Dwayne Johnson, Zac Efron, and Alexandra Daddario and a cast of unfortunately forgettable others.

To say that Baywatch has a plot would be only a disservice to the actual concept of narrative. Dwayne Johnson as Mitch and Zach Efron as Brody et al. operate as team of lifeguards. The first half of the film is team building and the constant ‘unwanted mentor’ role of Mitch to Brody. Soon, a generic drug dealing plot is revealed as being a reason to sustain a film for an unneeded two hours. Action ensues, jokes are told, and the plot meanders through Mitch’s platitudes of teamwork and responsibility as he constantly justifies he and his team’s vigilante actions.

Baywatch’s first and most glaring problem is on display from the get go. While at one point trying to be meta in the same vein as 21 Jump Street, it opts instead for complacent juvenile humor. During the first half hour, the punchline of every joke is accentuated by a seeming high school writer’s gleeful exuberance of the ‘f-word’ as a comedic tool. The jokes seem too stale to be formed by someone with Johnson’s charisma and natural comedic ability. The same can be said for Efron’s lines as most of the script seems to rely too heavily on their presence and not so much comedic chops (which Efron has showcased in other, better comedies). The other characters have little else to do than to be there for comedic effect without much discernible personality between them. For a film trying so desperately to make itself relevant, the actual humor in this comedy steadily keeps dragging through its self made drudgery of so-called comedic situations.

Although Baywatch tries so hard to not be, the often homophobic and misogynistic script (four screenwriters and a director thought a man touching another man’s genitals is cause for laughs?) offers little recourse. The inherent idea of bodies being the main focus of the television show and the now film is caustic to any idea of progressiveness. Even star Priyanka Chopra has said the film is a “feminist movie”, and yes, both male and female bodies are objectified but that should not be an excuse to still be objectifying, especially in this way and in this format. Other films can tackle these ideas in this platform of sardonic comedy, but Baywatch is neither competent nor interesting enough to offer any subtle meanings. It is unfortunate that the film so often misses the mark when it could have used these dated tropes of body-types-as-entertainment to show how ridiculous these constructions are. Yes, there is a male character with a so- called ‘dad-bod’, but that isn’t to offer any new commentary, only flat jokes. Baywatch seems terribly dated in its social commentary (or lack thereof).

Baywatch being an action-comedy could have at least offered some inspired action scenes, but director Seth Gordon keeps the same easy, generic scenes that hindered his other films. As a director, he has been given casts with enormous potential (like Jason Bateman and Mellissa McCarthy in Identity Thief) but he squanders their talent on the most juvenile of humor and uninteresting plots. Throughout Baywatch, there is a severe lack of fun from the cast and script and it hinders what could have been a basically fun summer film. Go talk with a lifeguard for two hours at a pool; it’ll be far more fun and relevant.

Grade – D

A Letter to Our Community

Entertainment Media is a fascinating subject. It’s very different from the brand of journalism created by our friends at The Chronicle. Many people would argue that it’s far more frivolous, that it doesn’t have the same social responsibility. That with all of the calamities and important stories going on there are better things to discuss than sports or music. I’ve often wondered, with so much work that needs to be done in our world, am I really choosing to make a difference by making entertainment?

I believe, though, that creating entertainment requires just as much social responsibility as journalism. It certainly has just as much social impact, if not more. And I realized this as I sought out my own reason for loving this industry so much. I used to say it was the intersection of art and technology that drove me to entertainment, and that’s still true. But in my time working at K-UTE Radio and attending this university, I’ve realized that’s not the whole story. The big “Why” for my love of entertainment is that entertainment spawns community.

I’m not sure why it took me so long to put this into words. A community surrounding entertainment is literally the definition of a fandom, something we know a lot about at The Geekwave. It’s been a goal of K-UTE Radio and The Geekwave for as long as I’ve been around. It’s the goal of any entertainment creator; although they may use more sterile terms like “growing audience” or “encourage engagement”. But at its core, it’s something very personal that you’re creating: a community of people that are brought together over a common love. And it’s powerful. Reddit is full of stories of people coming to the aid of strangers in their fandom. People who are literally connected by the entertainment they enjoy.

In my four years participating in and leading K-UTE Radio and The Geekwave, I’ve seen amazing things happen. We got to reach out to local artists and give them venues to showcase their work. We’ve had local business owners champion our cause and help us make connections in the community. We’ve offered our skills to the University and other student groups to create great experiences on campus. We assisted with the first Crimson Gaming events, an organization that would pave the way for the U’s Varsity Esports. We were a sponsor and organizer for the charity event Respawn Ready. We’ve given people and organizations trying to make a difference a place where they could speak to the world. We started out as a loosely joined group of shows trying to build our own small communities. We became to two large teams of people working together to support and build the communities that were already there.

But there’s one community that we created that I think may be the most powerful: The Student Media Team. I will never forget the passionate students that found a home here. I’ll never forget watching nervous freshmen who thought radio might be fun become creators and leaders. I’ll never forget watching students of different backgrounds become friends and teammates over their desire to work hard and make something together. We have had students come in with a story to tell or a message to convey and we’ve given them a microphone and a podcast. We’ve had geeks who love to gush about their favorite things and we’ve taught them to put their passion on paper. We’ve built brands, we’ve built websites, we’ve built makeshift studios and publishing schedules and individual portfolios and leaders. But most of all, we’ve built a family.

I’ll consider myself a part of this family for the rest of my life, and I know that I’ll always be welcome back at University of Utah Student Media. Thank you to every person who made these four years the greatest experience of my life. And good luck to Gustavo Cordeiro, Geoff Sutyak, and Lee Neuschwander as they lead our Entertainment Media into the future.

Keep Dreaming.

Jarom “Solar” Norris has been the Station Manager for K-UTE Radio for the past two years. He also was the Executive Producer of The Geekwave since he started it three years ago. If you’d like to keep following Solar and his projects, check him out on Twitter or at his website http://jarom.solar