On January 2011, the song “My Body” hit the airwaves and entered this generation’s collective consciousness. The song was very energetic and catchy. It was one of those songs that made you want to get up and dance or shout along. For starting indie-rock band Young the Giant, they never thought they would make it big. Little did they know that they would be a bigger band than they had ever imagined.

From the early days of their self-titled album to the current Home of the Strange, Young the Giant has always been a favorite band of mine. Each of their albums has an undeniable charm that has matured the more they write music. I was constantly on alert for when they would tour since the release of their newest album. There was no doubt in my mind that I would go, especially considering it had been three years since they last came. Once the dates were announced, I was able to get a ticket for the, no surprise, sold out concert.

I could tell this was going to be a big show with the amount of people bustling everywhere. The densely packed crowd stirred with commotion as they awaited the appearance of the main event. The stage was decorated with flags and the backdrop of Young the Giant’s new album. As I reached to get my phone from my pocket, the lights shut off and I was pushed forward by the current of fans eagerly wanting to inch closer to the stage. It was time.

The band had appeared and opened with the heart pounding, rock-ridden “Jungle Youth”. Each guitar strum and beat of the drum packed a punch. Sameer Gadhia, front man for the band, may have kept a bit of a poker face throughout the show, but his dance moves truly reflected his excitement for performing.

Young the Giant have quite a diverse repertoire that range from rock heavy songs like “Somebody to Believe In” to more soothing ones like “Titus was Born”. They easily transitioned from one to the other without having it seem strange or out of place. Songs like “Elsewhere” and “Art Exhibit” provided a nice, tranquil atmosphere that provided for a more intimate performance.

I couldn’t help but think how extremely talented each of them were as they played songs like “Cough Syrup”, “Mr. Know-It-All”, and “Mind Over Matter”. Payam Doostzadeh on the bass with a calm eloquence. Jacob Tilley and Eric Cannata on the guitar with astonishing dexterity. Francois Comtois drumming with smooth swiftness. And Gadhia not only had an impressive control over his voice, but a remarkable skill on various other instruments.    

They closed the show with “Home of the Strange”, where the whole band let loose and hopped from one side of the stage to the other. As they walked off the stage the crowd had become louder than they had ever been. Ears were ringing as we all enthusiastically cheered for an encore. It was not a wasted effort as Young the Giant returned to play three more songs.

“Amerika”, “Silvertongue”, and “My Body” brought out different excitement levels for both the band and the audience, increasing with every song. They brought an extra cheeriness to “My Body” as the entire crowd bounced to the highest of their abilities.

The show was exceptionally memorable and spirited. While I can recall many parts that were unforgettable, the one that catches my attention has to be when they played their song “Firelight”. This song mainly puts its focus on soft guitar string plucks and Gadhia’s airy vocals, but introduces some subtle drum beats towards the end. Gadhia requested that the audience take out their phones and lighters when the drums come on to light the venue. The dimly lit area transformed into a room as bright as a spotlight. It felt magical.

It’s no wonder that the Young the Giant show was sold out. They managed to play the entire Home of the Strange album plus some favorites from prior albums. There was such a joyous energy that rippled from the stage to the very last person in the back of the crowd. They played an incredible show that was worth going to despite being sick. I congratulate Young the Giant for how far they’ve come and I can’t wait to see what’s to come of them.

0 31