Chance The Rapper finally releases old mixtapes on streaming services

June 28th was a great day in the hip hop world for many reasons. I mean it was a Friday after all, which is known as the best day of the week for new music releases (you can check out all of June 28th’s new releases here). But the biggest reason that it was great is because Chance The Rapper has finally released his beloved 10 Day and Acid Rap mixtapes to music streaming services. The only streaming platform these projects had been on before today was Soundcloud, simply because they contained a lot of unreleased samples. But that’s a thing of the past now for the most part, so let’s dig into the projects a bit. 

10 Day

10 Day was inspired by Bennett having to serve a 10 day suspension from high school for marijuana possession in 2011. It is a very special project for me and a lot of other Chance fans. It was our first exposure to Chance and made him really stand out among his young Chicago peers.

10 Day was his first official release under the Chance The Rapper name that we all know and love today. It gave us a sincere and honest look into the life of a young high school aged Chance Bennett. The project is absolutely full of amazing and heartfelt jams that you don’t hear that much these days… 

  

Essential 10 Day Tracks

which leads me to my next point: there are so many songs on this project that are essential for any Chance fan or person wanting to get into his music now that it’s more accessible. Here are my most essential 10 Day tracks that you need to check out:

Acid Rap

Oh man, this is where it really starts getting good. I will say this right now: Acid Rap is a top five mixtape of all time, no question about it. The love and passion that went into creating this project is palpable; it just evokes so many different feelings. 

Acid Rap was released on April 30th, 2013 to widespread critical acclaim. The project was inspired by Chance’s use of psychedelic drugs LSD and acid, even though it wasn’t the only reason the project was created in the first place. He has said that Acid Rap is more musically than story based compared to 10 Day, while also being cohesive in its own way. Most of the artists and producers on the project are based in Chicago, making for a bigger hometown feel.  

      

Essential Acid Rap Tracks

Honestly all of the tracks on this project are essential, but me saying that isn’t the purpose of this section. Here are some of the most essential tracks off Acid Rap, even though you wouldn’t be wrong to just listen to the whole thing:

Should I listen?

To put it bluntly: if you are a fan of modern hip hop even in the slightest, you need to listen to these projects. There are both amazing in their own way and deserve the respect of hip hop fans everywhere. I can’t put into words how excited I am to finally add these classic tracks to my playlists and bump them all summer!

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Editor’s Spotify:My crunch playlist

As an Entertainment Arts and Engineering student I constantly find myself working deep into the night on my games or crunching. This week especially I had to crunch from one PM to one AM multiple nights in a row. You, dear reader, might be wondering how I managed to spend 12 hours fiddling with a computer screen? The answer is four words. Dope. Ass. Crunching. Playlist. Keeping me motivated and energized.

The secret to a Dope Ass Crunching Playlisttm is to strike a balance between songs that motivate and songs that will energizes as they play in the background whilst you work meticulously. Think of it as the Eminem vs. Chance the Rapper conflict. Eminem has been, is, and always will be my artist of choice for motivation. His raps are consistently about him kicking assand getting the respect he deserves. “Till I collapse I’m spilling these raps long as you feel ’em/Till the day that I drop you’ll never say that I’m not killing ’em/‘Cause when I am not, then I’ma stop penning ’em.” He is all about being the underdog, working hard, and winning, making him the perfect artist to start out a work session with. Hit the ground running and lose yourself in the music. But the emotional high of an Eminem song doesn’t go on forever, as the hours tick away something different is required, the motivation is there but no the groove.

Considered Chance the Rapper. I always put him in my Crunching Playlist, he also never raps about being the underdog and is nowhere near as aggressive as Eminem. But he is still great for working, his bars are fire, the beats are mellow but still have the energy to keep your pace, and who doesn’t want to listen to Chance’s voice while they work? He is perfect for mid crunch; his rhythms bring a groove that can be focused into working energy. For example, take the second half of the first verse of All We got “It was a dream, you could not mess with the Beam/This is like this many rings /You know what I mean? /This for the kids of the king of all kings /This is the holiest thing/This is the beat that played under the words /This is the sheep that ain’t like what it heard/This is officially first/This is the third.” Just reading that you can feel the groove bringing forth energy within, perfect for keeping a steady stream of work.

This dichotomy doesn’t exist only in rap either. It’s everywhere, Cold War Kids vs. Saint Motel, Devo Vs. Talking Heads, even Blink-182 Vs. Less than Jake. Whatever the genre I assure you there are certain bands that provide hard heavy hitting motivation, focusing on being the underdog and fighting you way back and bands that can just exude energy to maintain your work groove. Those bands make up any good crunching playlist. Of course, you still need to include Stan Bush’s classics The Touch and Dare from The Transformers: The Movie but I’ll explain that some other time.