Salt Lake Hip Hop: Agustist King

On September 13th, Hip Hop Drip DJs StavoSteelo and KyleInPlay had the pleasure of interviewing the up-and-coming SLC rapper Agustist King. King is a Salt Lake City native, hailing from the Central City neighborhood. He reps his own label called Independent Money Gang.

King has been seriously rapping for the last two years. He has recorded over 200 songs and released more than 50 of those. He works on numerous projects and releases them on all streaming services. Some of his projects include West Coke, Valentine’s Day Massacre, and Nirvana.

The Interview

Agustist King had much to say about his life, music, and reasons why he raps. However, those are only a few of the topics discussed in this 30 minute interview. It’s chock full of interesting content from a rapper that’s as real as he says he is.

Click the link below to listen to our interview with Agustist King. Be sure to follow him on his social media accounts @agustistking (instagram) and @agustistk (twitter). If you like what you hear, check out his website agustistking.com and Soundcloud. His Spotify and Apple Music profiles can be found searching his name, Agustist King.

Listen to the Hip Hop Drip radio show every weekday from 4-7pm to get your daily fix of quality hip hop from local Utah artists and the biggest stars in the game right now.

Songs from interview:

“Park Place Carter (Fiyah)” – Agustist King

“Off The Scale” – Agustist King

“Down” – Agustist King

The Hip Hop Drip remembers Mac Miller

The Hip Hop Drip is K-UTE Radio’s show for hip hop lovers, and as huge fans of Mac Miller, we were shocked and saddened to hear about his recent passing. The hip hop community lost yet another young legend, as the 26 year old Pittsburgh-native rapper/producer lost his battle with substance abuse and addiction.

This loss of life is yet another blow to the hip hop landscape after losing Lil Peep, Fredo Santana, XXXTENTACION, Jimmy Wopo, and countless others in the span of a year.  

In the days after, it’s only right for us to celebrate Mac’s accomplishments and thank him for the impact that he had in each of our lives.

A true artist

Mac Miller’s artistic abilities were noticed at an early age. Described as a “self-taught musician”, he was able to play the drums, guitar, bass, and piano. Playing these instruments started him down the road of making music and dropping mixtapes in high school. At fourteen years old, Mac released his first mixtape entitled But My Mackin’ Ain’t Easy under the name EZ Mac. After releasing numerous well-received projects, Mac signed with the independent Pittsburgh-based record label Rostrum Records.

His clout skyrocketed from there as he often collaborated with other artists signed to Rostrum Records including fellow Pittsburg natives Wiz Khalifa and ID Labs. It wasn’t long after that he announced his first studio album Blue Slide Park, which debuted at number 1 on the Billboard 200 and was the first independently distributed album to take a number one spot on the Billboard albums chart since 1995.

Fans watched Mac’s art evolve and grow, as he began producing beats under the name Larry Fisherman and going on to release numerous critically-acclaimed projects including Macadelic, Faces, and GO:OD AM. Mac released his last album Swimming on August 3rd, 2018, one month before he would be found unresponsive in his Studio City flat in Los Angeles, California.

Tyki’s take on Mac Miller

I was relaxing with my girlfriend on a Friday afternoon when the news about Mac Miller broke out. This one hit hard because he’s one of the few artists that we generally agree about, so we loved playing his music together. For me, Mac has always had a genuine likability about him. He is among the few artists that can hit almost any vibe with his music, while still standing out as one of the prominent backpack artists of my generation.

In addition, I know many of us felt as if we grew up with Mac Miller. I look back on lighthearted memories of being in my best friend’s backyard throwing down back flips on a trampoline while blasting “The Spins”. Mac took us along a journey throughout his career. As we watched him from his earliest days as the corny kid on the lacrosse team who would say anything for the rhyme, to being the multi-talented and deep artist we knew him as today. Mac was loved for his juxtapositions of wildly differing themes like motivation and depression. It was no surprise that he stood out as an inspiring voice in a generation full of lost kids.

As of now any possible motives or theories pertaining to his death are purely speculation, and in my opinion, of no real value in Mac’s case anyways. However, it was abundantly evident in the events leading up to his death that his mental health was not a high enough priority. I loved Mac, and I think I speak for all of us when I say that I was really rooting for him. As his life appeared to crumble in a matter of months, he hit us with some of his most inspiring work, which is why I think his death came as such a shock to many fans.

While his fans and family were hopeful for Mac, it’s clear that nobody knew the whole story. Sadly, history’s most talented and moving artists often turn out to be very self-destructive. Unlike other young artists to pass before their time, Mac left us with a prolific body of work that his admirers will be able to cherish forever.

Kyle’s take on Mac Miller

When I heard about Mac’s passing, I was at work just scrolling through /r/hiphopheads on Reddit during some downtime. I refreshed the page and at the top was a TMZ article saying that he was dead at age 26. Immediately after googling it, I found many more articles saying the same thing. It felt like someone kicked me right in the gut. I couldn’t believe this had actually happened.

Something about Mac’s passing feels different to me. The first song I ever heard from him was  “Nikes On My Feet” from his mixtape KIDS. I heard this song back in 2011 during my freshman year of high school. The song was dope and I proceeded to check out more of his music. I enjoyed the fresh sound that he brought to hip hop. It was so fun and playful and it kept me listening for a while.

I eventually drifted away from his music later on in high school because I thought his music was for kids. Later on I realized that this was a stupid reason to not listen to someone’s music.

When I picked his music back up again, it was right around the time that he released his sophomore album Watching Movies with the Sound Off. This album has a lot of sentimental value to me because I listened to it during a tough time. The song “REMember” has a very special place in my heart and I’ll always love it. It isn’t easy to cope with traumatic things in life, but this song helped me and I’ll always be grateful.

Mac was a very versatile artist and had something for every type of hip hop fan. He had bangers, heartfelt love songs, emotional songs, and drugged-out anthems. This is why Mac was such a unique artist; everything he did stood out in its own way compared to the rest of his discography.  He showed so much artistic growth and it was a pleasure to witness.

It still doesn’t feel real that Mac Miller is actually gone. It feels like I lost a big brother, and I’ll always miss him. He will be sorely missed in the hip hop community and in the lives of his many dedicated fans.

Thank you for everything you did for us and hip hop as a whole, Mac. You will never be forgotten and your legacy will live on in the hearts of all who loved you.

  

Highlighted tracks

“2009”

“Buttons”

“Fight the Feeling”

“The Best Day Ever”

“Birthday” (as Larry Fisherman)

Blackbear – digital druglord

Let me start by saying that I have never listened to Blackbear before his new album digital druglord released on April 21st. The only reason I even bothered downloading it while I was scrolling through my Spotify’s New Releases section was because I’ve seen him pop up on my Twitter feed a few times because one of our old hosts (shoutout the Based Captin) is pretty into him and retweets him every so often. I can usually trust my fellow Drip hosts tastes in music so I gave him a shot, and I have to say I was pleasantly surprised.

Before we dive into the actual tunes, I need to mention a few things. I love Blackbear’s aesthetic. I don’t usually like it when artists try to be different with their grammar, but the lack of capitalization and the replacing you with the Myspace style ‘u’ works for this. It makes it feel like there’s something missing, like he rushed through it, but his music is also frantic and desperate, so it fits. I’m also a big fan of artists that can tie everything together. One look at his album art and you know what you’re getting yourself into: drugs and sex. He knows who he is and he doesn’t try to hide it, in fact, he almost makes it beautiful. Plus, if you look at the middle pill bottle on the album art, you can see the Utah Healthcare logo, so shoutout Blackbear for representing the best school this side of the Mississippi.

This is an album about addiction and emotion. It’s a roller coaster ride where you experience his ups and downs. He goes from hating his girl and thinking she’s ungrateful to hating himself and believing she’s too good for him. He brags about the drugs he does, then croons about the dangers of his habits. I love that he’s not afraid to show his emotions, his fear, and his straight savagery. He is all over the place. One hook goes, “I would wish you the best, but you already had it,” while on another he sings, “I know you don’t wanna be that girl that’s f*****g what’s his face.” Blackbear also pulls in some key features. Juicy J’s predictable flow completes the song ‘juicy sweatsuits,’ and the songs with 24hrs and Stalking Gia are two of the best on the album. If you’re looking for an R&B style voice similar to Ty Dolla $ign or PARTYNEXTDOOR but with a better flow and darker and deeper content, Blackbear is your guy.

The production on this record also takes some interesting turns. The album begins with a mellow piano beat that quickly transitions to your classic bass and snare heavy hip hop beat on the second track. There are some songs with a more EDM focused beats and others tapping into Drake’s pop style. The majority of the beats are slow and mellow, as his delivery, perfect for cruisin’ in the car or vibing by yourself.

This is a good album, but it’s not without its’ negatives: namely its’ length. At barely 30 minutes long, I don’t really feel like it’s completed. My other major gripe is that at times it starts to sound like a dirtier version of some of The Chainsmokers anthems. Those things aside, it’s definitely worth a listen, especially if you’re trying to get in your feelings.

Blackbear will be in Salt Lake City on June 3rd at The Complex.