2019 Twilight Concert Series Kicks off

The 2019 Twilight Concert Series kicked off with Hippie Sabotage, Xylo, and Tishmal this past Saturday at the Galivan Center downtown. Kuteradio.org was thrilled when we heard that our partners at S&S took it upon themselves again to save the annual summer concert series this year!

Gallivan Center

This is the first year the concert series has come to the Gallivan Center. The change in location is ultimately for the better for the summer series. The Gallivan Center did exponentially better than Pioneer Park in terms of handling that many people for the sold out show. In addition, they have done a lot to make the Gallivan center a unique outdoor venue experience. They were lawn games in the mix, like giant pong and giant checkers, which was a fun interactive addition.

Hippie Sabotage

Hippie Sabotage came on around 8:30, treating everyone who came out to hear some fat beats to a clinic. We loved the crowd that showed up for the show. Everyone was having a good time at the new venue. There was a really big >21 presence at this particular show, but the younger generation still showed up and expressed themselves through costumes, outfits, body art, etc. Lots of community members came out for the show, and I ended up running into an old homie sporting some sick face-paint.

Looking Forward

We’re really looking forward to the rest of the Twilight Concert series this summer. There is a lot of diversity when it comes to the artists they are bringing out. All of the Hip Hop Heads of Salt Lake are certainly looking forward to seeing Vince Staples, Leikeli47, and local producer Concise Kilgore on August 8th! Thanks again to S&S for presenting the 2019 Twilight Concert Series and partnering with us to give our listeners the opportunity to see these shows for free!  Stay up with K-Ute on our social medias for ticket giveaways to all the next Twilight Shows and more S&S sponsored shows. Don’t forget to come say whats up at the U of U Student Media booth this Thursday for Blind Pilot at the Gallivan Center where we’ll be giving away even more free tickets and making connections with all of our fans!

Concert Review: The Faim

April 16th, 2019 @ The Depot

Normally, on a Tuesday night during the heat of finals, you can find me cramming textbooks and coffee in a dark corner of the library.  Last Tuesday, though, I was at The Depot in the heart of a crowd, dancing away my assignments, just to anxiously remember them in the morning.

Back in Black

The first thing I noticed as I arrived to the Depot was the long line filled with jet black swooping hairstyles, ripped skinny jeans and more fake leather than a Harley Davidson store. I should have expected this, considering the opener was Andy Black, lead singer of the infamous emo punk band Black Veil Brides. I changed and grew out of that phase, and I assumed others had too. Clearly I was wrong. It was at this point I knew the crowd had not come for The FAIM. But by the end of the show, would leave with them.

The FAIM

If Fall Out Boy and Panic at the Disco had a love child, it would be The FAIM. Still, their music is a melting pot of musical diversity, every song bringing a new sound. Lead singer Josh Raden stunned the crowd with his polished melodic voice that is even better live than on the recording. They started with “My Heart Needs to Breathe”. A jumping, pumping bop of a song and the perfect opener. Within seconds they had the crowd dancing along with them, with a few singing along as well. Truth be told, I can’t remember what came after the first song. It didn’t matter because all of their songs carried the same hyped up intensity as the opening act, a feat not many bands can achieve.

The FAIM didn’t falter for a minute from start to finish. Their set was mesmerizing and passionate. Intoxicating the crowd, holding them captive, and making them beg for more. Songs “Amelie” and “The Saints and Sinners” feature entertaining rock riffs and a catchy drum beat paired with dark lyrics. Ambitious and unpredictable with their shows, The FAIM create an ultimate alt-rock vibe. I caught up with bassist/keyboardist, Stephen Beerkens. He told me that every night is different, no show is the same. This is a band that truly loves what they do and are humbled and full of love for fans. Night after night The FAIM rises to the stage to live their dream and it shows.

A recap of K-UTE Radio’s Hip Hop Drip local talent showcase.

Hip Hop Drip: Voice of Salt Lake

Utah may have some unique cultural factors, but despite these the state still has a very strong, dedicated, and promising Hip Hop culture. During my time spent as a DJ and host at K-ute radio I have had the pleasure of interviewing and getting to know much of the local Hip Hop scene here in Utah on our rap segment, the Hip Hop Drip, that airs weekdays from 4-7 on Kuteradio.org.

Here at K-ute radio, it is our mission to give those that want a first shot at exposure and recognition the platform they need to have their music heard! This gives Artists the opportunity to promote themselves with an interview, play their music on air, and grow their following from our loyal listening base. In addition to this, we have begun holding regular K-UTE Radio presents shows, to showcase the talent that has come through our doors and to show them the love and respect they deserve!

K-Ute Presents

We held our second K-UTE Radio and The Hip Hop Drip Presents show at Kilby Court earlier this year and fans came out from every corner of Utah, in freezing temperatures, to turn up with us! We had an incredibly talented lineup of performers, most of which having dropped new projects within the last 6 months.

Getting Things Started

Our opener for the night, Undecided Music, gave us a taste of what is to come from them in the future. As one of the younger and less experienced acts of the night, they absolutely killed their set and were hopefully given the confidence they needed to keep making dope music!

This is when the 44 clique began showing up in droves to see their boy Koba perform songs off his latest project Dreams. This project is available for stream on SoundCloud under the FourFathers music page. Dee came out with some fresh out of the oven features which was a sweet surprise for the fans. Moving on in the night, big homie Pur2x showed up and showed out, performing tracks off of his debut EP Village Boy also available for stream on SoundCloud.

The Night Continues

The last three Artists to perform were the ones I was particularly excited for. I have personally interviewed them multiple times and I’m a big fan of their previous work. In addition to that, Lisa Frank, vinniecassius, and Adam Banx have been performing together at shows for sometime now. They’ve become the go to openers for big hip hop acts in the valley having worked with Kaskey, Rob Bank$, and Wifisfuneral in just the past few months.

Lisa Frank, took the stage by storm, opting out of an intermission, handing me a confetti canon instead to get his set popping off. He kept the crowd alive with the relentless energy of his music and interaction with the crowd. Keeping the vibe set by Lisa, vinniecassius performed his project Revenge Until Death that dropped only weeks before the event. Chockfull of high BPM bangers and trancelike melodies this project is certainly something you want to experience live someday.

Finally, a long time homie of mine and veteran of the Salt Lake City Hip Hop scene, Adam Banx took the stage as our headlining act. Arguably one of the most musically gifted artists in the scene right now, Adam writes all of his own music, composes a lot of his own beats, and engineers all of his projects for himself. He stays true to his unique style and doesn’t box himself into any specific genre. If you are into something a little more melodic, Adam Banx has definitely got what you want and plenty of it. He already has two complete projects, Illmedicine and Caution: Lanes Merge available on all major platforms, but also has the most amount of unreleased content and new material of any artist I have seen come through the station so far.

Whats next?

The night wrapped up around 10 o’clock and was a huge success for everyone including the station, myself, and the artists involved. By holding shows like this 2-3 times a year, K-ute Radio and the Hip Hop Drip hope to become a staple in the local music scene. As a go to source for promotions and opportunities we invite any artists looking to be heard to reach out to us and get an interview set up. Here at K-Ute Radio, the only thing we love more than music, are people who have a passion for music. We want to hear your story and help make your dreams a reality. Keep your eyes peeled for more live events and tune into Kuteradio.org for all of your favorite music and info regarding upcoming events and ticket giveaways.

I want to take this time to shout out all the performers and fans that came out and put shit down for local Hip Hop!

Mosh Pit Etiquette

Mosh pits may seem like total chaos, and for the most part they are! But mosh pits can also be lot of fun. Moshing is a good way to let loose, if you know how to behave. Behind the flailing flesh and dancing denizens of the pit is a set of guidelines which are in place to make sure everyone has a good time while throwing their bodies around. Hopefully, this guide will get you started on the right path so you can enjoy the most popular form of consensual violence.

It’s your choice to get in the pit

Don’t shove people into the pit. Putting a person in a mosh pit is signing them up for something without their consent, which is uncool. Once you’re in a pit it can be difficult to get out, so make sure everyone in the mosh pit wants to be there.

If someone doesn’t want to be there, they won’t go all out. This is less fun for everyone because they’ll get thrown around but won’t return what you’ve given them. Don’t feel like you have to put yourself in a mosh pit unless you want to match the kind of movement of the pit. Once you’re in, keep giving it everything you got and whatever happens, good or bad, know you’re there because you chose to be.

Help one another

Just because someone is in a mosh pit doesn’t mean they’re there to hurt each other.

Josh Sisk – Special to the Baltimore Sun

Sometimes, someone drops their glasses or phone, or falls over themselves. When something like this happens, you need to help that person get up or get their items off of the ground. Nothing ruins a mosh pit like someone losing their sight or literally getting stomped on. If someone calls out after losing their phone/wallet/keys/glasses, help them look! The sooner they have their things the sooner you can get back to moshing. If someone falls, make some room! It’s hard to get back up with thrashing bodies all over you.

Mosh with everyone

Hitting people can be fine, but don’t start fights. Moshing is about connecting with others. If someone hits you don’t single them out. Everyone is equal in the pit, and equally deserving of bumps and hits! If someone pushes you, maybe change where you’re being pushed so you run into somebody else. If it goes right, that motion gets amplified and energizes the pit even more!

There are several kinds of mosh pits. You’ll find them at everything from EDM festivals to metal concerts. Some are so crowded that all you can do is pogo. Other pits (like circle pits) have more space for you to throw yourself into others, and vice versa, giving everyone more room to be reckless and let loose. The point is to embrace it, and be considerate of others. Remember, you want to get along after all that moshing!

Ted Van Pelt – Flickr

J. Cole – Concert Review

On September 8th, Salt Lake City was blessed by the presence of one of the biggest hip hop artists out right now. Yes, the great J. Cole performed here for the first time in three years on his KOD Tour, and it was quite the show to behold.

Opening acts

The show started at about 8pm, with EarthGang coming out to perform first. They kicked the show off with a mix of  popular songs including “Missed Calls” and “Can’t Call It”. They brought good vibes to the crowd and it’s safe to say that they’ve earned some new fans.

After EarthGang finished up their set, it was Jaden Smith’s time to shine. Smith’s set was when the crowd really started to get into the concert mood and turn up. He performed songs such as “Batman”, “Icon”, and “George Jeff”, to the delight of many of those in attendance. To finish off his set, Smith performed “Icon” once again as he raced through the entire lower bowl. The crowd loved this and it got them into the performance even more. Jaden Smith put on a great show and he was a quality opener, as evident by the amount of hype he generated for the main act.

Young Thug was supposed to perform after Jaden Smith, but he didn’t show up for an unknown reason. With no third opening act, the crowd was left with a DJ playing music from J. Cole’s Dreamville label while they waited for Cole to come out. The anticipation was at an all-time high and the crowd could hardly contain it. More and more people started filing in from the concourse. And as the clock struck 9:15pm, the show kicked off.

Cole World

This is the moment that everyone had been waiting the whole night for. The openers were cool, but it was finally time for J. Cole to come out.

Suddenly the whole arena went black. The huge video monitor on the stage lit up and showed images of an infant right after it was born, with “KOD Intro” playing in the background. Once the intro ended, J. Cole appeared and we faintly heard the beginning of “Window Pain (Outro)”. Cole perfectly captured the emotions in this song with his performance, and it was a very harrowing moment. The crowd was in awe seeing one of the greatest artists of their generation performing it.

Next, Cole threw it back to 2014 Forest Hills Drive and played crowd favorites “A Tale of 2 Citiez” and “Fire Squad”. After these tracks, he brought it back to KOD and played the majority of the album.   

Cole didn’t just stick to these two albums however. To the delight of many fans, he played a few tracks from his debut album Cole World: The Sideline Story, as well as a couple from 2016’s 4 Your Eyez Only.

After throwing it back a bit to his previous work, Cole took a moment to address the crowd about very serious issues that are currently facing our society. With emotion in his voice, he talked about the mental health crisis that he addresses quite frequently on KOD. This was the most emotional and heartfelt that I’ve ever heard J. Cole, and it was my personal favorite moment of the entire show. He urged the crowd to love their life and seek help when they need it, and then he played two of his more personal tracks, “Love Yourz” and “Apparently”.

Following the sentimental moment, Cole played more tracks from 2014 Forest Hills Drive and then finished the show with the last two tracks from KOD. The album’s title track, “KOD”, was another highlight of the show, purely because you could tell that the entire crowd was waiting for it the whole night.

Cole then thanked the crowd for showing up to the show and then walked off the stage. They chanted “one more song” until he finally came back out and performed perhaps his most recognizable track, “No Role Modelz”. He definitely closed out the show with a bang.

Final Thoughts

This was absolutely a night to remember. J. Cole put on an amazing show that was well worth the money that those in attendance spent. He performed songs from every era of his music and truly encompassed his entire artistic direction. It was especially cool hearing him perform his older tracks and being able to compare them to his latest. It really shows the growth that he has had and makes me  appreciate him that much more.

If you missed this show, I urge you to go see J. Cole when he comes to Salt Lake City again. Even if you aren’t his biggest fan, you will get your money’s worth.

Caught in a Dream – Sales at In the Venue

No Vacation

I walk into In The Venue in Salt Lake City as No Vacation is walking on stage. The poorly lit room is already 75% full, but will soon fill up for the sold-out show. Their first song is an epic instrumental piece highlighted by a beautiful piano melody with soft cymbals played under mallets. No Vacation sets the scene for a dreamy night of live music.

Playing with 5 musicians, the Bedroom Pop band originally from San Francisco first got together in 2015. Their sound is light and airy. Their songs are simple and beautiful. Built with heavy reverb, No Vacation channels a shoegaze type tone. Their music makes you want to lie on a grassy hill and watch the clouds float by as you feel the breeze.

Despite the nearly packed house, the crowd resonates an abnormal silence after their applause. The lead singer and guitarist, Sabrina Mai, calls us respectful. A strange compliment to be given during a concert.

Near the end of their set, they play the song “August”. Following a brief keyboard introduction, a sample with a familiar voice saying, “Hello it’s me, Mario” wakes the crowd up from a musically induced coma. No Vacation puts on a fantastic show that last around 40 min. I personally enjoyed their set more than the headliner for the show.

Sales

By 9 o’clock the venue is completely packed. The sweltering August heat begins to make itself known. Sales’ music is lo-fi guitar pop. They are comprised of 2 guitarists and a drummer playing on half a drum-kit. Despite their minimalist sound, Sales play several songs that are straight-up jams. Hundreds of hipsters dance around doing their best to not touch anyone around them.

Singer and guitarist Lauren Morgan informs the audience that they have been doing this completely independent, without a record label or band manager. This causes the crowd to erupt and a small joy to spark inside me. It’s always awesome to see that some people are just in it for the music and nothing more.

Moreover, for one of the songs, the audience is asked to turn their flashlights on to set the mood. This instead lights up the entire room because the venue is so small. A man in the crowd carries around a 90’s style VHS recorder that I would love to see the footage of.

Sales play most of the songs I was looking forward to seeing including “Getting it on”, “Renee”, and “Pope is a Rockstar”. Morgan has a hauntingly beautiful voice as she often does this raspy whisper into the microphone. The guitar parts ring out in poignant sublimity. However, many of their songs sounds the same and leave me rather bored. Their final song was the first time I felt they showcased originality and this is mostly due to prolonged improvisation. Still, theirs and No Vacation’s sets made for a good night of music and dancing.

Dancing the Night Away with Passion Pit

Every so often I need a night of dancing, pressed against 1000 sweaty bodies, screaming lyrics into the air. You can imagine my excitement when I heard Passion Pit was playing at The Depot. I was in for a such a night and a memorable one at that.

Opening band Courtship did little to entice me. As soon as they took the stage I leaned over to a friend and whispered, “I’m probably not going to like this band.” I know I shouldn’t judge a book by its cover, but it was just so tempting. Hailing from Hollywood, they were the embodiment of LA hipsters. 4 good-looking boys played unoriginal indie-pop, dressed in designer clothes made to look like they came from a thrift store.

The music was pompously poppy and portrayed the sense that everything is happy and magical. Songs seemed to lack depth and complexity. The crowd went crazy as they covered “Hey Ya” by Outkast. The guitarist, who was essentially a glorified hype man, told a story about seeing Passion Pit years ago and how it was a dream come true to open for them just one year after forming a band. Dreams aside, I couldn’t wait for them to finish their set and Passion Pit to take the stage.

When Passion Pit front man Michael Angelakos stepped into the light I knew we were in for a show. He has a tremendous amount of swag in his shirt and tie, casually undone and untucked. He is confident and relaxed with the crowd that is looking to unwind themselves. Eager anticipation sweeps over the audience as they wait for the music to begin. Passion Pit jumps into “I’ll Be Alright” and the crowd erupts. They know every word and boogie with the music.

Passion Pit is currently touring following the 2017 release of their fourth studio album Tremendous Sea of Love. Formed in 2007, the indietronica band from Cambridge, Massachusetts has known moderate success. Manners (2009) and Gossamer (2012) performed well both critically and commercially. While their most recent albums have been less well received, Passion Pit continues to make their mark in the electropop world.

The crowd helped carry the concert and made it special. Due to Angelakos’ singing style, the vocals are fairly quiet. The voices of 1000 others singing along amplify the music and fill the room. Their love and help is appreciated and expressed by Angelakos. He jokes that his voice was never that strong, but the always energetic crowds of Salt Lake do the work for him. Passion Pit played the hits for around 70 minutes, including, “Sleepyhead”, “Carried Away”, and “Lifted Up (1985)”. After a brief exit and chanting from the crowd, Passion Pit returned to the stage to play “Talk a Walk”, the cherry on top of the sundae.

Passion Pit put on a marvelous concert. Michael Angelakos was entertaining and got the crowd involved. The dance-heavy show didn’t drag on and tire out the fans. The sound quality at The Depot is always top-notch. At the end of the day there is nothing better than live music, especially when it’s as good as Passion Pit.

Octopus Project at Urban Lounge

Monday Night. In Utah, typically reserved for families, board games, and green Jell-O. For some they are better occupied listening to live music at Urban Lounge, Salt Lake City. Of course, I’ll choose the latter. Not too many people left their nieces and nephews on Jan 22 when The Octopus Project came to town. When I first walked in there were only about 10 other people, exactly the way I like it.

Intimate shows are the way to go. Small venues with the stage right in front of your face. No metal barriers dividing musicians and the audience.  This is how music should be played/watched. There are too many ultra-artists playing in those mega-domes and super-stadiums. And some guy payed $200 for him and his daughter to sit in section 317 row J. Anyway, enough with my rant. Back to the important stuff.

The first band was SLC natives Indigo Plateau. With two guitars, bass, drums, and vocals they have a pretty classic dream-pop/alt-rock sound. And they sound pretty good. Both guitarists use a variety of effects during song interludes creating a nice atmosphere. Their music doesn’t blow me away with originality but an altogether strong sound. They were a good opener, playing for about 30 minutes.

The second act was New Fumes from Dallas, TX. A single musician graced the stage. A guitar hung around their neck and was surrounded by a variety of electronic gismos and gadgets creating the rest of the music. The music was wildly experimental. The vocals were incomprehensible and drowned out by the sheer noise. You’d often loose sense of tempo and rhythm. It was on the verge of being something truly original and cool but wasn’t quite there.

Headlining the show was Octopus Project. I first heard about them through a friend just a few weeks prior. I looked them up on Spotify and really liked what I heard. They are an experimental neo-psychedelic band from Austin, TX with a noteworthy sound. On stage, they are incredibly talented. The four musicians move around from instrument to instrument, each playing multiple throughout their hour-long set. Three of them provide lead vocals on at least one song, but much of their music is instrumental. They seem to have a strong connection as a band and play off each other immaculately.

Octopus Project put it all into their performance. Band-member Josh Lambert opened the show saying, “I know it’s cold and it’s a Monday but let’s have a fucking awesome time together.”  And that we did. The crowd had grown considerably but was still sporadic. Nevertheless, people danced, whooped, and hollered. Yvonne Lambert played an electronic instrument called a Theremin, which is played without physical contact. All-in-all it was a delightful show with excellent music.

Music is often inspiring and can teach us important life lessons. But sometimes it doesn’t have a deeper meaning. Sometimes it’s just meant to be enjoyed. Seeing Octopus Project was a chance to simply enjoy some live music.