Women of K-UTE

Happy International Women’s Day 2018!

Here at K-UTE, we greatly appreciate the powerhouse women on our team – few though we may be. This year has seen the most female involvement at the station as far as I’m aware and that warrants some recognition. Here are a few of these amazing ladies and what they enjoy most about being involved with the radio station.

Click on each person’s name for a link to their Instagram page!

Sage Holt

Sage is one of our freshman DJ’s and wasted no time in getting involved with our station. She doesn’t quite know what she wants to pursue as a degree, but she’s thinking of testing out music production to see if that’s what she’d like most. When I asked her what her favourite part of K-UTE is, she said “I LOVE that K-UTE radio has given me a family on campus.” She then continued by saying “It’s people like you who make it what it is and I can’t imagine my life without you. You’ve already made my college experience with memories I’ll never forget … also I love you.” She was trying to make me blush with that last bit, but I return those sentiments wholeheartedly. She also writes blogs! Check out her first year reflection here.

Tomey Fox

Tomey (seen here with her boyfriend Sterling) is a freshman and hopes to major in civil engineering. You can often catch her drawing in her sketchbook while in the studio between choosing phenomenal songs to play. Her favourite thing about K-UTE is “all the opportunities you can take advantage of just by reaching out.” She makes a good point with that – there are tons of concerts, conferences, positions, and friends all available if you ask. We aren’t a part of the station just to say we’re involved with something. We’re a part of the station to be involved and get the most out of our time here.

Sophia Chartrand

Sophia is a sophomore going for a major in writing and dwells mostly in the land of the W.A.R. Room – K-UTE’s EDM time block. One thing that she enjoys about being a DJ is “being able to play whatever I want for everyone… and I’ve met some dope people while doing it!”


Sarah Bischoff

Sarah is a senior and English Literature major who exists  within K-UTE as a valuable member of The Booket List. She shared that the podcast “gives me the ability to argue with an audience about what I love … it’s a highlight of my academic experience.” She’s involved in other organisations on campus such as the English Student Enrichment Association and writing resource center. We will also soon be publishing pieces together under the title of “Morahnic Satire” wherein we shall satirise anything and everything. Nothing is sacred. Nothing is real. Nihilism.

Jessica Sandrock

Jessica is also a senior and English Literature major. As one of our front desk / secretary people, she has come in clutch many times by printing off assignments for me to pick up while running to class. Her favourite thing about K-UTE is the people. “It’s great to be affiliated with a group of passionate music lovers. I’ve had a blast blogging about concerts and hanging out at the Twilight Concert Series.”

Ellen Lewis

Ellen is a senior and double majoring in Film & Media Arts and Gender Studies in addition to being one of our DJ’s and a member of Studio200. Her favourite thing about K-UTE is “a tie between (1) getting to talk to other music lovers on campus about our favorite artists and (2) forcing everyone tuning in to listen to French pop music from the early 1960s.” When she’s not hard at work on something cool/artsy, she’s probably haunting estate sales. Speaking of her cool/artsy endeavors, mark your calendars and schedule time to get to her art show opening reception!

Morgan Parent

Finally, here’s me! I’m a junior and am getting a degree in Communication, Strategic Communication to be exact. I’ve been involved with K-UTE since January 2017 and I’ve been the Social Media Manager all this time. I’ve also been a DJ on the Midday Mix, conducted in-person & phone interviews, and written blogs (my first one can be found here). My favourite parts about this organisation are the people I’ve met, events I’ve attended, and opportunities I’ve found.


It’s an honour to work alongside these angels, but my goal for next year is to get even more women involved! We all have different backgrounds and parts in the organisation but are alike in our ambition and love of music. There is a place for anyone in K-UTE and that’s another reason why it’s so great.

Some other phenomenal gals on our team that weren’t featured include:

  • Allison Allred – another essential member of The Booket List
  • Elena Payne – one of the best front desk people known to humankind
  • Elly Smith – impending blog writer and barista extraordinaire
  • Helen Finch – a new name in the station who is in training to do a podcast

Follow my grrrl gang anthems playlist on Spotify to keep the girl power going!

Show Review: STRFKR at the Depot

Get to know the band STRFKR

 Now before you rack your brain for a possible acronym that these six letters could possibly stand for I will confide in you, it is pronounced exactly as you think. There are few bands that can promote a name so outlandish and strange, while being able to stay true to those same claims. This Portland based band is one of those few.  STRFKR took the stage in one of Salt Lake’s most cherished venues, The Depot presented by S & S and K-UTE Radio!

The show opened with a set by Reptaliens whose musical genre was much of the indie, electronica, and pop we know so well from STRFKR. However, it was not just the music of Reptaliens that caught the audience’s attention. Throughout their set, a woman dressed in a skin-tight body suit continued to make appearances. A new outfit dressed this mystery woman every song. Close to the end of their set, she was accompanied by what looked like extra extremities. Equipped with about 5-foot-long extensions for arms she danced rhythmically with the music. Creating a kind of hypnotic trance that added perfectly to the psychedelic ambiance and psyching out the crowd.  Unfortunately, the trance soon ended, and the audience sat quietly waiting for the main act to appear.

Here come the techies

Anticipation and longing was all that could be felt in the sea of an impatient audience. With teasers of the bands logo’s appearing then disappearing and musical technicians walking on and off the stage, the audience grew restless and dispersed around the venue. Until… someone else walked on. The audience looked at the stage with excitement. They  dismissed this new figure thinking them to be yet another techie fidgeting with yet another musical instrument. Although when the mystery figure sat in front of the keyboard, a pink, bowl-cut, wig gleamed in the light catching many eyes as well as my own. At this moment the electric keyboard came to life as this thought-to-be-“techie” drew screaming fans from every corner of the venue. Fans rushed towards the stage jumping, screaming, coming to the realization that this was  Josh Hodges. STRFKR‘s keyboardist. sometimes guitarist, and lead singer, played as his fellow band members joined him on stage.

The main act from outer space 

The band enchanted the audience with new hits from their latest release, Vault Vol. 3, such as “Amiee” and “Alaska” but also blessed us with some old favorites like “Rawnald Gregory The Second” and “While I’m Alive”. A few astronauts jumping with the music and a human sized bunny shooting streamers through the air accompanied the band onstage. Audience members where periodically picked up by friends and fellow music lovers to crowd surf on a rhythmically moving audience. This concert was one of joy, enchantment, and “good vibes” as my fellow millennials will agree. For those of you who were not able to attend this sold out show, do not fret. They will be sure to come back to our beloved Salt Lake. Once again they will fill a small venue with the “Golden Light” this Portland’s STRFKR is known for. 

What’s on My Playlist?

It’s important for me to find new releases to listen to, especially when a new semester is underway. Sometimes, however, I like to look back at the older tunes that inspire me, or those I never gave a proper chance. The following playlist includes a little bit of all three.

“House of Woodcock” by Jonny Greenwood

Jonny Greenwood just received a nomination for Best Original Score for his work on Phantom Thread, and it’s not hard to see why. “House of Woodcock” gives a small but beautiful sample of the soundtrack, with luscious arrangements of strings building atop a rubato piano line. The result is both stirring and decadent, a perfect match for the film.


“Coyote” by Joni Mitchell

Joni’s music has been around for a while, it was only in the last month that I committed to diving into her discography. Hejira was my first stop, and from the moment the first track “Coyote” played I was hooked. Subtley is the key here, as Joni masterfully uses her voice to weave around a cyclical groove, sustained by Jaco Pastorious’ mesmerizing bass work. For any of those looking to ponder the meaningful-meaningless of the snow (or lack thereof), look no further than the unabashed glaze of this album.

“Repeater” by Fugazi

Unlike Joni Mitchell, Fugazi carries their subtleties in a much more present manner. So, where does one begin with their discography? Look no further than their (ironically) titled, and first formal album, Repeater. The title track “Repeater” in particular sets a precedent for the unrelenting pace of the album, with screeching guitars and sticky-sweet bass grooves playing over a rolling drum line.


“Get Me Away From Here I’m Dying” by Belle and Sebastian

The wistful nature at the core of Belle and Sebastian’s music has always given their work a weight that puts it above the average selection of jangle-pop. Nowhere is this better exemplified than on “Get Me Away From Here I’m Dying”. Coming off the band’s second LP If You’re Feeling Sinister, the song slowly builds upon Murdoch’s graceful melodies and acoustic guitar with bass, percussion, and trumpet until reaching a crescendo both stately and emotionally resonant.

“Jesus, etc.” by Wilco

How do you take influences of the western contemporary, ranging from country to folk, and recontextualize them for a suitable, modern musical context? Look no further than Wilco’s Yankee Hotel Foxtrot. This is an album that thrives on brutal honesty, poetic semantics, and the inevitable washed-out heritage of the 21st century American. The resulting tracks, like “Jesus, etc.”, both surprise and reward in ways few songs can.


Looking for more music to start your week off right? Check out my other playlist here.

The Magic Of Music: Sam Lachow

Sam Lachow is a producer, songwriter, rapper, videographer, director, and editor of video and music.

Raised in both Seattle and New York City he’s been making videos since elementary school, and as a seventh-grader began a group called Shankbone. Sam began directing and producing music videos with Shankbone and went on to create videos for various other artists.


Then in 2011, Sam released his debut project as a solo artist, “Brand New Bike”. Produced entirely by Sam, the album utilized many live instruments from musicians based in Seattle and New York. The next year Sam released 2 EP’s and produced/directed dozens of music videos from the projects on his YouTube channel, which now has over 7 million views.

I had an amazing chance to attend his show with Rittz when they rolled through the Complex on November 9th to talk about his successes within his music. Check out the interview below!

First off, how are you doing? 

I’m doing so good, man! We just had a really great show at the Complex. The crowd was amazing – it was fun!

Glad to hear that! Do you like Salt Lake City?

I actually really do! I don’t like the weird laws, but it’s a beautiful place. The crowd’s always turnt up.

What inspired you to get into the rap game?

It started out as a complete hobby! In 6th grade, I started a band called Shankbone – it was me and two other Jewish kids because a shank bone is a Jewish dish! Then people started really liking it and that’s when I realized I was good at it. So I just kept doing it and then I went to college in New York, and at the same time, I knew I wanted to make music for a living.

When you got into rapping, were there any musical instruments that inspired you to do what you do now? 

I’m a drummer! I love live music so in my beats, I try to incorporate live music. But I’m not really good at any instrument, so I hire people that are really good at them and I tell them what I want. I was lucky to go to a high school where there was a great jazz band, so I know a bunch of incredible musicians.

Growing up, which artists did you look up to? 

For rappers, I’m a big flow man – lyrics are great, of course, but I’m into the flow. For example, you can’t write a good drum solo. I would say I look up to Notorious B.I.G. and Andre 3000! I also love Devin the Dude, who’s not as known, but his beats inspire me a lot.

Touring with Rittz, how does it feel? How did you gain the opportunity to join this tour? 

It’s not the most entertaining story, but we found out Rittz was going on tour and he doesn’t have a big following up in the Pacific Northwest, but my following up there is big. So we struck a deal with him that if I went on the tour, we would bring a shit ton of people out to the Pacific Northwest shows. Meanwhile, he has a huge following down here, and we had never met, we just talked online! But we decided to do it! He’s a cool dude though! He’s been in the game for a long time and he’s got amazing stories. I’ve been learning a lot from this tour!

Out of all the songs you produced, which one would you say is your favorite and why?

I go by what I still tolerate and listen to because I’ve heard my songs so many times. I love “Dreams of Gold” though because it’s just really good! I remember making it by a collaborative effort and it was a good time in my life!

If you were to give an aspiring rapper a piece of advice, what would you say to them? 

Make sure that it’s a complete passion! It can’t be something you’re doing because you want to become a famous rapper because that’s one in a billion. You have to do it because you love doing it. I would do it even if I wasn’t making a living for it. It would be something I would do all the time. Don’t think about making a bunch of money because fans can tell if you are making real music or if you’re just trying to be a “rapper”.

What was the most recent TV show that you binge-watched?

Curb Your Enthusiasm! It’s my favorite show! People compare me to Larry David a lot because random shit will annoy me. My dad reminds me of, Larry David!

Give Sam Lachow some love and follow him on all his social outlets!





68′ Rock n’ Roll with a Kick in the Pants

Rawr! Snarl! Crash! These are the words that come to mind when listening to the band 68’. The group is comprised of Josh Scogin on vocals and guitar, and Michael McClellan on drums.  Their sound is self-described as rock n’ roll with a kick in the pants, but it’s not exactly easy to put this bluesy rock duo in a box. They definitely peddle a heavy rock sound, and I really wouldn’t expect anything less given Scogin’s past screamo endeavors with Norma Jean, and as The Chariot’s metalcore front man.

Two Parts Viper is the group’s sophomore album, released earlier this year, and it’s intense to say the least. The entire album embodies the essence of rock n’ roll and it’s just as intense as their first album. Upon the departure of Matt Goldman on guitar, Scogin has added McClellan on drums, which has better enabled the two-man group to take their sound to the next level. Each song incorporates complex instrumental interludes alternating catchy riffs with vocals and lyrics that give you that fast-paced rock n’ roll vibe.

Tracks worth noting include “Life is Old, New Borrowed, and Blue” which metaphorically punches you in the face with the abrasive riffs battling it out against badgering one liners. The turbulent nature of the song conjures up a restlessness that makes it almost too much fun to sing along to. “Death is A Lottery” is another song on Two Parts Viper that successfully hammers out an intense melody and artistic instrumental construction which compliments the lyrical composition to produce an intense display of chaotic harmony. Memorable lines such as “Maybe I’m right, maybe I’m wrong, death is quick, but it can last so long” are passionately poured out in an abrasive ballad.

The track “Apologies” is another favorite on the album, and it’s one that showcases the artistry of both members. This song creatively paints a rock n’ roll picture with steady drum lines and Scogin’s bluesy angle of delivering crashing lyrics only to be broken up by an interlude of spoken word which embodies the poetry in such a way that’s sure to appeal to most rock n’ roll rebel personas.

Every song on the album hits like a hurricane, and, the band is even better live. I had been sleeping on the new album for the last six months until finally discovering the awesomeness that is Two Parts Viper. However, once I became keen to its rock n’ roll mastery, I’ve been listening on repeat enough to redeem myself from my negligent misstep. And recently I was rewarded for my intense fandom as I realized that the band would be opening up for The Bronx playing here in Salt Lake City, which I had already scored tickets to.  

The performance was incredible and it was not merely two musicians giving you their best songs to promote their latest album, it walked the line of performance art. Scogin and McClellen performed in a symbiotic trance that had the energy of a killer punk show and the depth of a complex piece of art. They masterfully abused their instruments, while performing in sync to produce the most chaotic display of musical art I’ve ever seen. The performance was so intense and awe-inspiring, I hardly enjoyed the main act that played after them, and as I left the show, I knew that I had just witnessed something special, something rare, an unbelievable display of talent. And with that, I can honestly say, Two Parts Viper rocks, but if you get the chance, don’t miss them live.

The Music of Halloween

I love the month of October. Utah is beautiful, you can pull out your old sweaters, and of course Halloween. Aside from the jack-o-lanterns, costumes, and candy, the sounds of this season are amazing. Hearing creaking doors, howling wolfs, or whispering winds can make the hair on the back of your neck stand up. Music is the greatest thing to create a mood, and the music inspired by Halloween does just that.

During the ancient Celtic festival Samhain, people would light fires and wear costumes to scare off ghosts. That night they would play dark folk music. These haunting tunes, known as souling songs, are still played in parts of Europe today. Children go out in groups singing these souling song and begging for treats.

Dark classical music is often associated with Halloween for its mysterious overtures and frightening melodies. Johann Sebastian Bach’s Toccata and Fugue in D Minor” and Ludwig van Beethoven’s Symphony number 5 in C Minor” are iconic songs recognized by many as the first Halloween songs. Dozens of other composers from Rachmaninoff to Vivaldi have taken a crack at capturing the eeriness, suspense, and gloom of this beloved time.

In recent years, horror films and their accompanying scores have been a new way to showcase scary music. Movies live and die by their soundtrack. Good horror films have soundtracks that put you on the edge of your seat and make the film enticing. Films such as Psycho, The Shining, and Saw have powerful musical themes which add to their popularity and success. Other movies like Jaws and Ghostbusters feature songs that have become so popular they stand alone. The Nightmare Before Christmas and A Clockwork Orange are two of my personal favorite horror film soundtracks.

Halloween has also made its way into the rock and pop world over the last few decades. Bobby “Boris” Picket’s “Monster Mash” was released in 1962 and was #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 prior to Halloween of that year. Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” was listed as the most successful music video by Guinness World Records and is in the Library of Congress. It’s safe to say that people love scary music.

Aside from the two Halloween songs that everyone knows, many other artist have been inspired by the horrors of Halloween. The Cure’s “Lullaby” from the album Disintegration (1980), is a haunting track and the one of the darkest from the gothic-rock band. They sing an ominous tale of the always hungry Spiderman.

David Bowie’s song “Scary Monsters (and Super Creeps)” features screeching guitars and sharp piercing chimes. Bowie sings of running scared from the horrors of monsters. Other songs inspired by this holiday include The Ramones “Pet Sematary”, Morrissey’s “Ouija Board, Ouija Board”, and Alice Cooper’s “Feed My Frankenstein”.

Although Halloween lacks full length albums, like Christmas, there is a wide variety of music that features themes of fear, fright, and horror. For centuries, this music has been revered by several different cultures. Today it is the music of October, the music of Halloween. It shows how music can create powerful emotions and is one of the reasons why this time is beloved by so many.