What’s On My Playlist? #2

With the fall semester in full swing, there’s no better time to find some fresh music to keep you on your feet. Here are some songs that I’ve been listening to so far:

“how do you sleep” by LCD Soundsystem

For a nine minute track, “how do you sleep” passes by at an incredibly fast rate, but that’s to the credit of the track. It starts quiet and gloomy, dissonant strings creeping in the background beside Murphy’s vocals, with plucky synths bubbling at the surface as drums rattle ever-onward. Before you know it, the bass synth comes crashing in, and if that doesn’t win you the dance beat certainly will.

 

“Trampoline” by Kero Kero Bonito

With a large amount of music last year reflecting on more somber topics (often in beautiful fashion), it can be surprisingly refreshing to listen to a song about something as simple as jumping on a Trampoline. That’s what exactly what Kero Kero Bonito does on “Trampoline”, mixing together punchy synths with a snappy percussion and bubble gum vocals. The end product is a song that is endlessly addicting and a touch ethereal, which is appropriate given the music video.

 

“Cary Me Back” by Mild High Club

Alex Brettin’s project gets compared to Mac Demarco a lot, and that’s fair given the fact he toured with the guy, as Benjamin Scheim notes in his review of the album Skiptracing on Pitchfork. “Carry Me Back”, however, manages to successfully utilize Brettin’s influence as a stepping stone, blending the breezy feel and vocal style of Mac Demarco with a syrupy mix so drenched in reverb it would make Beach House proud.

 

“Fastlane” by King Geedorah

Growing up I was a diehard fan of the Godzilla films and their wonderfully corny dubbing, so I was immediately fond of MF Doom’s turn as King Geedorah on the album Take Me To Your Leader. “Fastlane” in particular captures some of my favorite aspects of the album: bits of sampled audio (including from the film Invasion of the Astro Monster)  mix with epic grooves and a relentless momentum to create a work both timeless and time-hallowed.

 

“Is This Music?” by Teenage Fanclub

To an extent, Teenage Fanclub’s album Bandwagonesque has lost some of its appeal since its initial release, but that is largely due to how influential the album is: everyone from Liam Gallagher to Kurt Cobain sung the band’s praises, and their sound was mimicked throughout the 90s. While some of the novelty has worn off, “Is This Music” still shines; it’s a roaring, instrumental track built upon the foundation of layers of distorted guitar, mustering enough energy and power to part the clouds and pick you off your feet.

 

“Going Somewhere” by Jessy Lanza

I didn’t listen to Jessy Lanza’s album Oh No, released last May, in full until this summer, but it may be one of my favorite releases of 2016. With a deft use of stereo and a dry mix, Lanza creates an all-encompassing soundscape of synth-pop that rings right in the ears. These qualities shine best on “Going Somewhere”, where Lanza delivers breathy vocals over a rattling percussion and synth that build up to a tasteful crescendo.

What’s On My Playlist? #1

This summer has been a fantastic era for new music and new artists. Here are some of the songs that I’ve had on repeat this past June.

“Die Young” by Sylvan Esso

“Die Young” is a perfect combination of bittersweet lyrics and bubbly, bass-infused indie-pop beats that’ll make you want to hop in the car and leave everything behind. Plus, their new album What Now has similar hits like “Radio” and “Kick Jump Twist” that utilizes creative computer-esque beats and intriguing lyrics.

“Loving Someone” by The 1975

While their latest album came out in 2016, I can’t seem to stop listening to “Loving Someone” and pretty much every other song from The 1975. They have a beautiful talent of mixing aesthetic value and music together in a way that transports you to another place when you listen to them. For me “Loving Someone” is a song that uses poetic lyrics and dreamy synths to create a visual image every time you listen to it.

“Sober” by Lorde

As a long time fan of Lorde’s music, I was both hesitant and excited to listen to her new album, Melodrama. While I didn’t fall in love with her first hit from the album, “Green Light,” once I heard the opening to “Sober,” I was entranced. The song begins with eerie and desperate vocals that aptly sets the tone for the song. The subtle chorus and punching lyrics will definitely hit the heart of any angsty teen, like myself.

“Loudspeaker” by MUNA

I’ve already written an article on MUNA’s new album About U , here, but something about them has left a lasting impression. The lead singer, Katie Gavin, has such a unique voice, and all of their songs, like “Loudspeaker,” have an empowering, passionate, and truthful tone that goes straight to the heart. Plus, their style and aesthetic are to die for.

“Alone” by Halsey

While “Now or Never” is the staple hit from her new album Hopeless Fountain Kingdom, the song “Alone” has stuck out to me personally. The Pink Floyd-esque opening is an interesting instrumental lead into lyrics about a life of partying and fame, while still feeling completely lonely when the glamor fades. While I’m not sure if I can relate, I still feel like wistfully looking through a window with my heart shaped sunglasses on whenever I hear the song.

“Amsterdam” by Nothing But Thieves

Ever since I heard their first hit, “Trip Switch,” Nothing But Thieves has formed a special place in my heart. The song “Amsterdam” is a rock filled anthem that makes you wanna headbang in a circle, but the vocals and melody are catchy enough that you’ll be humming it long after the song is finished.

Summer Boy by “Lady Gaga”

Yes, this song was originally released in 2009, but it’s integral to any summer playlist, and as soon as you press play on this track, you’ll understand why. Lady Gaga’s iconic vocals and pop-powered electric guitar riffs make the song feel like pure candy to the ears. Plus, the light-hearted and whimsical lyrics make it a perfect summer jam.

Editor’s Spotify:My crunch playlist

As an Entertainment Arts and Engineering student I constantly find myself working deep into the night on my games or crunching. This week especially I had to crunch from one PM to one AM multiple nights in a row. You, dear reader, might be wondering how I managed to spend 12 hours fiddling with a computer screen? The answer is four words. Dope. Ass. Crunching. Playlist. Keeping me motivated and energized.

The secret to a Dope Ass Crunching Playlisttm is to strike a balance between songs that motivate and songs that will energizes as they play in the background whilst you work meticulously. Think of it as the Eminem vs. Chance the Rapper conflict. Eminem has been, is, and always will be my artist of choice for motivation. His raps are consistently about him kicking assand getting the respect he deserves. “Till I collapse I’m spilling these raps long as you feel ’em/Till the day that I drop you’ll never say that I’m not killing ’em/‘Cause when I am not, then I’ma stop penning ’em.” He is all about being the underdog, working hard, and winning, making him the perfect artist to start out a work session with. Hit the ground running and lose yourself in the music. But the emotional high of an Eminem song doesn’t go on forever, as the hours tick away something different is required, the motivation is there but no the groove.

Considered Chance the Rapper. I always put him in my Crunching Playlist, he also never raps about being the underdog and is nowhere near as aggressive as Eminem. But he is still great for working, his bars are fire, the beats are mellow but still have the energy to keep your pace, and who doesn’t want to listen to Chance’s voice while they work? He is perfect for mid crunch; his rhythms bring a groove that can be focused into working energy. For example, take the second half of the first verse of All We got “It was a dream, you could not mess with the Beam/This is like this many rings /You know what I mean? /This for the kids of the king of all kings /This is the holiest thing/This is the beat that played under the words /This is the sheep that ain’t like what it heard/This is officially first/This is the third.” Just reading that you can feel the groove bringing forth energy within, perfect for keeping a steady stream of work.

This dichotomy doesn’t exist only in rap either. It’s everywhere, Cold War Kids vs. Saint Motel, Devo Vs. Talking Heads, even Blink-182 Vs. Less than Jake. Whatever the genre I assure you there are certain bands that provide hard heavy hitting motivation, focusing on being the underdog and fighting you way back and bands that can just exude energy to maintain your work groove. Those bands make up any good crunching playlist. Of course, you still need to include Stan Bush’s classics The Touch and Dare from The Transformers: The Movie but I’ll explain that some other time.